Journal of
Development and Agricultural Economics

  • Abbreviation: J. Dev. Agric. Econ.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9774
  • DOI: 10.5897/JDAE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 525

Full Length Research Paper

Cocoa farmers’ choice of alternative livelihood in mining communities in Upper Denkyira West District, Ghana

Kennedy Agyei-Manu
  • Kennedy Agyei-Manu
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
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Fred Nimoh
  • Fred Nimoh
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
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Millicent Owusu-Peprah
  • Millicent Owusu-Peprah
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
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George Baffour Kyeremateng
  • George Baffour Kyeremateng
  • Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana.
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  •  Received: 17 March 2020
  •  Accepted: 02 June 2020
  •  Published: 31 August 2020

Abstract

Mining and cocoa production are important livelihoods for people in Ghana, particularly in rural communities like Upper Denkyira West District. However, mining activities can have negative impacts on cocoa production and access to basic necessities for the sustenance of the people. This study sought to investigate cocoa farmers’ perception of the impact of mining on socio- economic activities in Upper Denkyira West District and the determinants of their choice of alternative livelihoods. A structured questionnaire was used to collect primary data from 211 respondents who were selected via a multi-stage sampling method for the study. The study found that cocoa farming households agree that mining has negative impacts on socio-economic activities in the district. It was also revealed that about two-thirds of the cocoa farming households were engaged in farm-based and nonfarm-based alternative livelihoods, in addition to cocoa farming. Results from the empirical multinomial logistic regression model showed that sex, years of formal education, farm income, technical skills, extension services, and perception that mining have reduced farm sizes, and farm outputs significantly influence cocoa farming households’ choice of alternative livelihood. The study recommends the need for policies aimed at promoting skills acquisition and facilitating access to markets for products of alternative livelihoods.

Key words: Mining, cocoa, alternative livelihoods, multinomial logistic regression, Upper Denkyira West District, Ghana.