Journal of
Ecology and The Natural Environment

  • Abbreviation: J. Ecol. Nat. Environ.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9847
  • DOI: 10.5897/JENE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 335

Full Length Research Paper

Woody species composition and structure of Amoro Forest in West Gojjam Zone, North Western Ethiopia

Liyew Birhanu
  • Liyew Birhanu
  • Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University, P. O. Box 3434, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Tamrat Bekele
  • Tamrat Bekele
  • Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University, P. O. Box 3434, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Sebsebe Demissew
  • Sebsebe Demissew
  • Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University, P. O. Box 3434, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 16 March 2018
  •  Accepted: 10 May 2018
  •  Published: 31 May 2018

Abstract

Ethiopia is one of the biodiversity reach areas in the world. A study was conducted at Amoro Forest to determine the woody species composition, vegetation and population structure. Vegetation data were collected from 36 plots (900 m2) systematically laid along transects. A hierarchical cluster analysis with R software was used to identify plant communities. Structural analysis of the forest was performed based on frequency, density, DBH, basal area and importance value indices (IVI) of woody species. A total of 57 woody species belonging to 38 families were encountered, consisting of 19 tree (33.33%), 31 (54.38%) shrubs, and 7(4.37%) liana species. The vegetation of the forest was classified into four plant communities namely, Calpurnia aurea-Vernonia myriantha, Vernonia myriantha-Euphorbia abyssinica, Laggera tomentosa-Solanecio gigas, Allophyllus abyssinicus-Bersama abyssinica based on cluster analysis. The total basal area and density of woody plants were 18.5 m2/h and 2860.49 stems/h respectively. The DBH distribution showed a reverse “J” shaped curve, meaning that there is active regeneration and recruitment in the forest. Four representative woody plant population structures were identified, that is, inverted J, Gauss I, Gauss II and J- shaped patterns. There is high anthropogenic effect and high dependence of the local community in Amoro Forest so that forest conservation and restoration measures should be required.

Key words: Ethiopia, Amoro Forest, vegetation communities, anthropogenic activities and population structure.