Journal of
Ecology and The Natural Environment

  • Abbreviation: J. Ecol. Nat. Environ.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9847
  • DOI: 10.5897/JENE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 354

Review

A review of Uganda and India’s freshwater aquaculture: Key practices and experience from each country

N. kasozi
  • N. kasozi
  • Abi Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute, National Agricultural Research Organisation, P. O. Box 219, Arua, Uganda
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J. Rutaisire
  • J. Rutaisire
  • National Agricultural Research Organisation, Secretariat, P. O. Box 295, Entebbe, Uganda
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S. Nandi
  • S. Nandi
  • Division of Fish Genetics and Biotechnology, ICAR- Central Institute of Freshwater Aquaculture, Kausalyaganga, Bhubaneswar-751002, India.
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J. K. Sundaray
  • J. K. Sundaray
  • Division of Fish Genetics and Biotechnology, ICAR- Central Institute of Freshwater Aquaculture, Kausalyaganga, Bhubaneswar-751002, India.
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  •  Received: 28 November 2016
  •  Accepted: 23 February 2017
  •  Published: 28 February 2017

Abstract

This paper reviews the current status of freshwater aquaculture in both India and Uganda. India has a long history of aquaculture, dating from the 4th century. Subsequently, the country has become a major contributor to global aquaculture and is believed to have more than 10% of the global fish diversity. Currently, India is the second largest aquaculture producer in the world with global contribution of 6.3% and the major contribution comes from freshwater aquaculture, whose share has gone up from 46% in the 1980s to over 85% in the recent years. Since 1980s, India has emerged as one of the largest investors and trading partners of Uganda. As such, there is much that Uganda can adopt from the India’s freshwater aquaculture given their political, social and economic relations established overtime between the two countries. As the largest producer of Indian major carps, India has set the pace for change and innovation in culture practices since the 1960s. Uganda’s aquaculture is also undergoing changes to meet the challenges of increasing demand, such comparisons through comprehensive literature review and case studies can form a strong foundation for future investment in aquaculture. In addition, generating information for each country’s comparative advantage in aquaculture can assist in developing strategies for structural adjustment programmes. Some of those strategies, might promote integration of economic activities, human capacity building, information sharing and technology transfer.

 

Key words: Aquaculture, carps, fish, freshwater, India, Uganda.