Journal of
Infectious Diseases and Immunity

  • Abbreviation: J. Infect. Dis. Immun.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2375
  • DOI: 10.5897/JIDI
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 81

Editorial

The curious tale of how crocodiles farmed for designer leather handbags are helping to develop human anti-arboviral vaccines

Andrew W. Taylor-Robinson
  • Andrew W. Taylor-Robinson
  • Infectious Diseases Research Group, School of Health, Medical & Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, 160 Ann Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 29 March 2018
  •  Accepted: 04 April 2018
  •  Published: 30 April 2018

References

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Australian Government (2015). Our North, Our Future: White Paper on Developing Northern Australia. Last accessed 29 March 2018. 

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Australian Government Business. Porosus – Getting under the skin. Last updated 3 May 2017.

 
 

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Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation and Science. $13.9 million to unlock Northern Australia's business potential. 17 October 2017. Available at: 

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Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation and Science. Cooperative Research Centre Projects selection round outcomes. Last updated 20 February 2018. Available at: 

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Cluff R. Crocodile anti-viral vaccine research paves way for dengue, zika solutions in humans. 7 February 2018. Available at: 

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Colmant AM, Etebari K, Webb CE, Ritchie SA, Jansen CC, van den Hurk AF, Bielefeldt-Ohmann H, Hobson-Peters J, Asgari S, Hall RA (2017a). Discovery of new orbiviruses and totivirus from Anopheles mosquitoes in Eastern Australia. Arch. Virol. 162(11):3529-3534.
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Colmant AMG, Hobson-Peters J, Bielefeldt-Ohmann H, van den Hurk AF, Hall-Mendelin S, Chow WK, Johansen CA, Fros J, Simmonds P, Watterson D, Cazier C, Etebari K, Asgari S, Schulz BL, Beebe N, Vet LJ, Piyasena TBH, Nguyen HD, Barnard RT, Hall RA (2017b). A new clade of insect-specific flaviviruses from Australian Anopheles mosquitoes displays species-specific host restriction. mSphere 2(4):e00262-17.

 
 

Graham BS, Mascola JR, Fauci AS (2018). Novel vaccine technologies: essential components of an adequate response to emerging viral diseases. JAMA 319(14):1431-1432.
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Griffiths E (2017). Fascinating facts about the Australian saltwater crocodile. Available at: 

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Gyawali N, Bradbury RS, Taylor-Robinson AW (2016). Do neglected Australian arboviruses pose a global epidemic threat? Aust NZ J Public Health 40(6):596-596
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Gyawali N, Taylor-Robinson AW (2017). Confronting the emerging threat to public health in Northern Australia of neglected indigenous arboviruses.Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2(4):55.
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Gyawali N, Bradbury RS, Aaskov JG, Taylor-Robinson AW (2017a). Neglected Australian arboviruses: quam gravis? Microbes Infect. 19(7-8):388-401.
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Gyawali N, Bradbury RS, Aaskov JG, Taylor-Robinson A.W (2017b). Neglected Australian arboviruses and undifferentiated febrile illness: addressing public health challenges arising from the 'Developing Northern Australia' Government policy. Front. Microbiol. 8:2150.
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Northern Territory Government (2018). Crocodile facts. Availacle at: 

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Randolph SE, Rogers DJ (2010). The arrival, establishment and spread of exotic diseases: patterns and predictions. Nat. Rev.Microbiol. 8(5):361-71.
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Satapathy S, Taylor-Robinson AW (2016). Bridging the knowledge gap in transmission-blocking immunity to malaria: deciphering molecular mechanisms in mosquitoes. Adv. Infect. Dis. 6(1):33-41.
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Simmons D (2017). Croc industry worth more than $100M to Australian Economy. Business News Australia. 27 July 2017. Available at: 

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Smith H (2018). Vaccination aims to protect NT crocs from damaging virus. 10 March 2018. Available at: 

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Taylor-Robinson AW (2017). A La Ni-a climate event-associated major wet season in Northern Australia raises the spectre of a surge in mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical north Queensland. J. Infect. Dis. Med. Microbiol. 2(1):6-7.

 
 

University of Queensland, School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences (2017). SCMB researchers to get under croc's skin. Available at: 

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University of Queensland, UQ Researchers (2018). Chimeric insect-specific flaviviruses: a new generation of diagnostics and vaccines against mosquito-borne viral disease (2018–2020). Available at: 

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Wilder-Smith A, Gubler DJ, Weaver SC, Monath TP, Heymann DL, Scott TW (2017). Epidemic arboviral diseases: priorities for research and public health. Lancet Infect. Dis. 17(3):e101-e106.
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Wildlife Health Australia (2016). West Nile and Kunjin virus in Australia – factsheet. April 2016. Available at: 

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