Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3631

Full Length Research Paper

Ethnobotanical studies of medicinal plants used in traditional treatment of malaria by some herbalists in Ghana

Tonny Asafo-Agyei
  • Tonny Asafo-Agyei
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Heron R. Blagogee
  • Heron R. Blagogee
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Susana Oteng Mintah
  • Susana Oteng Mintah
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Mary-Ann Archer
  • Mary-Ann Archer
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Frederick Ayertey
  • Frederick Ayertey
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Alexis Conrad Sapaty
  • Alexis Conrad Sapaty
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Peter Atta-Adjei Jnr
  • Peter Atta-Adjei Jnr
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Daniel Boamah
  • Daniel Boamah
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Jerry Asiedu-Larbi
  • Jerry Asiedu-Larbi
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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Alfred Ampomah Appiah
  • Alfred Ampomah Appiah
  • Centre for Plant Medicine Research, P. O. Box 73, Mampong Akuapem, Ghana.
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  •  Received: 06 May 2019
  •  Accepted: 28 June 2019
  •  Published: 30 September 2019

Abstract

The use of medicinal plants for the treatment of diseases including malaria is a common practice in Ghanaian traditional medicine. The objective of this study is to document indigenous knowledge of medicinal plants used for the treatment of malaria through ethno-botanical studies to facilitate the discovery of new sources of drugs. The study was carried out in 2018 at the Centre for Plant Medicine Research (CPMR) among 36 registered herbalists of the Ghana Federation of Traditional and Alternative Medicine (GHAFTRAM). Data was collected based on oral interview with each of the 36 registered herbalists with the aid of a well-structured questionnaire. Only data from willing respondents were documented after obtaining their consent to participate in the study. 42 different plant species belonging to 27 families were identified as being used by GHAFTRAM herbalists in treating malaria. Among the various plant parts used, the leaves were the most reported (41%), and all of the medicinal preparations were decoctions prepared by boiling the plant parts. About 93% of the herbalists collected plants from the wild, whereas the 7% were collected from their immediate surroundings (within 100 m of their homes). Major threats to the continues availability of medicinal species of plants as indicated by the respondents included: farming activities (40%), bushfires (33%), over-harvesting (14%), and drought (13%). Majority (56%) of the herbalists reported uprooting whole plants as their method of collecting medicinal plant parts. The results of the study suggest a need for conservation and sustainable harvesting strategies to conserve plant wealth in Ghana.

Key words: antimalarial, conservation, medicinal plants, Ghana Federation of Traditional and Alternative Medicine (GHAFTRAM), traditional medicine