Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3654

Full Length Research Paper

Evaluation of the toxic effects of the bottled medicine (garrafada) containing the Echinacea purpurea, Annona muricata, Tabebuia avellanedae, Pterodon emarginatus and Uncaria tomentosa in rats

Denise Michelle Indras
  • Denise Michelle Indras
  • Laboratory of Cellular Toxicology, State University of Western Parana, University Street 1619, 85819110 Cascavel, PR, Brazil.
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Carla Brugin Marek
  • Carla Brugin Marek
  • Assistance Center in Toxicology (CEATOX), Hospital University of Western Parana, Avenue Tancredo Neves 3224, 85806470 Cascavel, PR, Brazil.
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Ana Julia Penteado
  • Ana Julia Penteado
  • Laboratory of Cellular Toxicology, State University of Western Parana, University Street 1619, 85819110 Cascavel, PR, Brazil.
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Fabiana Sari Ferreira
  • Fabiana Sari Ferreira
  • Laboratory of Cellular Toxicology, State University of Western Parana, University Street 1619, 85819110 Cascavel, PR, Brazil.
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Fernanda Coleraus Silva
  • Fernanda Coleraus Silva
  • Laboratory of Cellular Toxicology, State University of Western Parana, University Street 1619, 85819110 Cascavel, PR, Brazil.
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Ana Maria Itinose
  • Ana Maria Itinose
  • Assistance Center in Toxicology (CEATOX), Hospital University of Western Parana, Avenue Tancredo Neves 3224, 85806470 Cascavel, PR, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 15 October 2019
  •  Accepted: 08 January 2020
  •  Published: 31 March 2020

Abstract

This study evaluated if the oral administration of a bottled medicine containing Echinacea, Graviola, Purple Ipe, Sucupira and Cat’s claw could cause changes in biochemical, coagulation, hematological and histopathological parameters in rats. This study arised after a report to Ceatox of a patient who used a bottled medicine and developed hematological, renal and histopathological changes. The bottled medicine possesses 4.32 mg alcohol.mL-1 and by the phytochemical screening and UV/Scan tests showed some classes of secondary metabolites. In experiments using Wistar rats, two treatments were performed, single dose and 30 days, administering water, alcohol and bottled medicine by gavage. In the single dose treatment, alterations of uric acid, cholesterol, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, iron and glucose (p<0.05) were found. Already in the 30 days treatment were alterations of uric acid, total and indirect bilirubins, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, triglycerides, erythrocytes and leukocytes (p<0.05), and hepatic sinusoidal dilatation. The data showed that the alcohol present in the bottled medicine can alter biochemical, hematological parameters and cause liver damage in rats. The bottled medicine, although not showing alterations in important biochemical and hematological parameters, had more pronounced liver histopathological alterations.

Key words: Bottled medicine, biochemical, coagulation and hematological parameters.