Journal of
Plant Breeding and Crop Science

  • Abbreviation: J. Plant Breed. Crop Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9758
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPBCS
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 372

Full Length Research Paper

Evaluation of coffee berry disease resistance (Colletotrichum kahawae) in F2 populations derived from Arabica coffee varieties Rume Sudan and SL 28

James M. Gimase
  • James M. Gimase
  • Coffee Research Institute, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), P. O. Box 4-00232, Ruiru, Kenya.
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Wilson M. Thagana
  • Wilson M. Thagana
  • Department of Agricultural Science and Technology, Kenyatta University, P. O. Box 43844 – 00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
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Chripine O. Omondi
  • Chripine O. Omondi
  • Industrial Crops Research Institute, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), P. O. Box 16 – 80109, Mtwapa, Kenya.
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John M. Ithiru
  • John M. Ithiru
  • Coffee Research Institute, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), P. O. Box 4-00232, Ruiru, Kenya.
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  •  Received: 13 June 2019
  •  Accepted: 23 September 2019
  •  Published: 30 November 2019

Abstract

Coffee supports livelihoods of approximately 125 million families worldwide and over 700,000 households in Kenya. The epidemics of Coffee berry disease (CBD), caused by Colletotrichum kahawae, destroy up to 80% of the developing berries on susceptible varieties. The control of the disease using chemicals accounts for 30 to 40% of the production cost and contributes to environment pollution, hence the use of resistant varieties. Resistance to CBD is conferred by three genes; R, T that are dominant and k which is recessive, from coffee varieties Rume Sudan (RS), Hibrido de Timor (HDT) and K7 respectively. Although the T gene has been mapped, there is need for genetic mapping of the other genes to improve selection efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate F2 populations of RS x SL28 for their suitability to genetic mapping of the R gene in RS. Resistance to CBD was evaluated by hypocotyl inoculation on their F3 progenies. The data was subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Chi Square (χ²) test. The ANOVA result showed significant differences (P≤0.05) between the genotypes to CBD resistance. The phenotypic ratio of resistance to susceptible plants fitted the 3:1 monohybrid inheritance ratio for a dominant gene using the χ² test (χ² = 1.0565 and P=0.30207, P≤0.05), hence confirming the suitability of the F2 populations for the identification of the DNA marker for R gene in RS.

Key words: Rume Sudan, SL 28, Coffee Berry Disease, mapping population, hypocotyl, inoculation.