Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 569

Full Length Research Paper

Co-infections with Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths among school-aged children in Saki, Oyo State, Nigeria

Adekola Saheed Salawu
  • Adekola Saheed Salawu
  • Department of Zoology, ObafemiAwolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Samuel Ore Asaolu
  • Samuel Ore Asaolu
  • Department of Zoology, ObafemiAwolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Oluyomi Abayomi Sowemimo*
  • Oluyomi Abayomi Sowemimo*
  • Department of Zoology, ObafemiAwolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 04 July 2014
  •  Accepted: 15 September 2014
  •  Published: 31 December 2014

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and urinary schistosomiasis and the co-infection of these intestinal helminths among school children in Saki town, Oyo state, Nigeria. Early morning stool samples were collected and a Kato-Katz thick smear technique was used to examine and count parasitic load.Urine samples were also collected and examined for Schistosoma haematobium ova using sedimentation technique. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data, knowledge attitude and practice of individuals towards disease transmission and control. The study was conducted between August and October, 2011; out of 1537 children examined, 956 (62.2%) of the study participants were infected with one or more parasites. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most frequently observed soil-transmitted helminths with a prevalence of 39.6% followed by hookworm (18.3%) and Trichuris trichiura (12.9%). S. haematobium was detected in 32.7% of the school children. Multiple infections were pronounced with 54.3% having double infections and 17.7% having triple infections. The most common double infections were Ascaris and S. haematobium (28.9%), while the most common triple infections were Ascaris, hookworm and S. haematobium (10.6%). Prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted helminth and S. haematobium was high and there is the need for urgent intervention programmes against these parasites in the study area.

 

Key words: Soil-transmitted helminthiasis, schistosomiasis, epidemiology, prevalence, Schistosoma haematobium, Nigeria.