Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 569

Full Length Research Paper

Challenges of integrated disease surveillance response reporting among healthcare personnel in Mangu, Plateau State, Nigeria

Luret Albert Lar*
  • Luret Albert Lar*
  • Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B .2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.
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Tolulope Olumide Afolaranmi
  • Tolulope Olumide Afolaranmi
  • Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B .2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.
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Yetunde Olubusayo Tagurum
  • Yetunde Olubusayo Tagurum
  • Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B .2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.
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Benjamin Uzochukwu
  • Benjamin Uzochukwu
  • Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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Ayuba Ibrahim Zoakah
  • Ayuba Ibrahim Zoakah
  • Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B .2084, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 01 February 2015
  •  Accepted: 06 March 2015
  •  Published: 30 April 2015

Abstract

Integrated disease surveillance and response comprises data collection, analysis, interpretation and feedback on communicable and non-communicable diseases like cholera and hypertension. It assists health workers detect and respond to these diseases. The regional office for Africa of the World Health Organization implemented it in 1998. Nigeria has embraced this strategy, but there are challenges regarding implementation. This interventional study determined challenges faced by healthcare workers on reporting these priority diseases. One hundred and eight respondents were recruited using multi-stage sampling. Pre-tested, interviewer-administered questionnaires and baseline data were collected on respondents’ knowledge, practices and factors affecting the report. Training was given and post-intervention data collected. Data was analysed using Epi info and a p value of ≤ 0.05 was statistically significant. Mean knowledge scores improved from 2.92 ± 1.72 to 4.61± 1.03; post-intervention, those of practice increased from 1.90±2.8 to 2.86±3.4, the availability of the forms for reporting was the most challenging factor among 30 (27.8%) respondents, pre-intervention. There were statistically significant associations with the availability of reporting forms (p<0.0001), the receipt of commendation (p<0.0001) and feedback (p=0.0007) post-intervention. Though this strategy is not challenge free, training healthcare personnel can minimize challenges.

Key words: Setbacks, disease reporting, West Africa.