Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 569

Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence of Schistosoma and other parasites among female residents of some communities in Oyo State, Nigeria

Awobode Henrietta Oluwatoyin
  • Awobode Henrietta Oluwatoyin
  • Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Okunlola Deborah Olukemi
  • Okunlola Deborah Olukemi
  • Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Oyekunle Abidemi Omolara
  • Oyekunle Abidemi Omolara
  • Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Adekeye Taiwo Adetola
  • Adekeye Taiwo Adetola
  • Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 28 August 2015
  •  Accepted: 20 November 2015
  •  Published: 31 March 2016

Abstract

Prevalence of Schistosoma and other parasitic infections in 507 females (5-78 years) was determined in a cross-sectional study undertaken in seven communities of Oyo State, Nigeria.  Urine and stool samples were examined, and 25.2% overall parasite prevalence was recorded. Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni prevalence was 5.5 and 0.3% respectively. Ascaris lumbricoides (11.4%), Hookworm (9.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.6%), Trichuris trichiura (0.3%), Taenia saginata (1.2%) and Entamoeba histolytica (0.8%) were also identified from stool and Trichomonas vaginalis (0.3%) from urine of participants.  Schistosoma haematobium egg intensity ranged between 100-145 eggs / l0 ml urine. PCV was determined for all participants, values ≤ 32% was recorded for 67.1% of the parasite positive participants and 100% of Schistosoma infections.  A correlation (0.75, p > 0.05) was established between PCV and parasite intensity. Schistosoma infection was highest (13.5%) amongst 11-20 year olds but absent in women 41-50 year old. There was a positive correlation (0.90, p > 0.05) between age and S. haematobium egg intensity.  A. lumbricoides and hookworm infections were predominant in children (1-10yrs) while women (21-30 years) had infections of   all the identified parasites.  Concomitant infections (2.2%) of S. haematobium with other parasites were recorded. The high prevalence of infections amongst women of child bearing age and adolescent girls with the attending low PCV suggests the importance of parasitic infections in these groups. This emphasizes the need for intervention measures targeted at all members of these communities to interrupt transmission.

Key words: Schistosoma species, intestinal parasites, PCV, female residents, Oyo State.