Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 613

Review

Modern practice in orthognathic and reconstructive surgery – Craniofacial distraction osteogenesis

Kumar Dheeraj1,2, Namrataa Rastogi3 and Meenakshi Singh4
1Department of Prosthodontics, Sardar Patel Post Graduate Institute of Dental and Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India. 2102-A, Vijay Nagar, Krishna Nagar, Kanpur Road, Lucknow, India. 3Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Sardar Patel Post Graduate Institute of Dental and Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India. 4Department of Orthodontics, Sardar Patel Post Graduate Institute of Dental and Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.
Email: [email protected]

  •  Accepted: 04 March 2011
  •  Published: 30 April 2011

Abstract

Distraction osteogenesis (DO) techniques have been widely accepted and practiced in orthopaedics, traumatology, and craniofacial surgery. Over the last two decades, using DO methods, many previously untreatable conditions have been successfully managed with outstanding clinical outcome. Although the mechanism of DO is still not fully understood, it is generally accepted that mechanical stimulation is the key in promoting and maintaining tissues’ regenerating capacities. In the management of severe maxillomandibular deformities, orthognathic surgery produces less than optimum outcome with greater chances of relapse. Inadequate bone contact, insufficient fixation, stability and partial or total relapse due to excessive muscle stretching are often observed. To overcome these disadvantages a path breaking work in the field of distraction, osteogenesis occurred. The present article aims at highlighting the advantages of this newly developed technique over previous surgical remedies.

 

Key words: Distraction osteogenesis, orthopaedics, craniofacial surgery, orthognathic surgery.