Journal of
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health

  • Abbreviation: J. Vet. Med. Anim. Health
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2529
  • DOI: 10.5897/JVMAH
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 328

Full Length Research Paper

A study of Newcastle disease virus in poultry from live bird markets and backyard flocks in Kenya

Irene Nafula Ogali
  • Irene Nafula Ogali
  • Institute of Biotechnology Research, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O Box 62000-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.
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Erick Ouma Mungube
  • Erick Ouma Mungube
  • Veterinary Science Research Institute, Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization, P.O. Box 32-00902.
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Jacqueline Kasiiti Lichoti
  • Jacqueline Kasiiti Lichoti
  • Directorate of Veterinary Services, State Department of Livestock, Ministry of Agriculture Livestock and Fisheries, Kangemi, 00625 Nairobi-Kenya.
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Moses Were Ogugo
  • Moses Were Ogugo
  • International Livestock Research Institute, P.O Box 30709-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
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Sheila Cecily Ommeh
  • Sheila Cecily Ommeh
  • Institute of Biotechnology Research, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O Box 62000-00200, Nairobi, Kenya.
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  •  Received: 28 March 2018
  •  Accepted: 21 June 2018
  •  Published: 31 August 2018

Abstract

A countrywide cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the presence of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in poultry in live bird markets (LBMs) and backyard poultry farms in Kenya. A total of nine hundred and twenty two (922) poultry in backyard flocks and four hundred and fifty four (454) poultry in LBMs were examined. Overall, NDV was detected in 10.1% (46/454) of the poultry sampled in live bird markets. In backyard flocks, NDV was detected in 3.6% (33/922) of the poultry sampled. Regional variations in NDV occurrence was observed in both live bird markets and poultry flocks. Markets in major towns and cities had significantly (p<0.05) higher NDV detection rates. Higher NDV detection rates were observed in backyard farms in Lake Victoria Basin than other regions. Chicken had the highest NDV detection compared to other poultry species. The study detected NDV in apparently healthy chicken and brought forward the probable high importance of carrier birds in the circulation and transmission of NDV and in causing outbreaks. The study also points to the usefulness of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in screening for NDV to prevent the outbreaks and control of ND in Kenya. 

Key words: Backyard poultry, chicken, Kenya, live bird markets, NDV, RT-PCR.