African Journal of
History and Culture

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Hist. Cult.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-6672
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJHC
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 165

Review

The Nigerian child in war and peace, 1960 to 2010

C. C. C. Osakwe
  • C. C. C. Osakwe
  • Department of History and War Studies, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
A. Lipede
  • A. Lipede
  • Department of History and War Studies, Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 11 May 2017
  •  Accepted: 06 June 2017
  •  Published: 31 August 2017

Abstract

Peace as the absence of both direct and indirect violence in Nigeria has eluded the Nigerian child. From the perspective of direct violence, the Nigerian child has not been spared the horrors of wars that have dotted Nigeria’s geographical space since independence. From the perspective of indirect violence, the Nigerian child has been thrown to the center stage of structural and cultural violence. This has combined to challenge the long walk of the Nigerian child to peace and security within Nigeria. However, in the analysis of war and peace in Nigeria, the plight of the Nigerian child is rarely brought to bear. From the home to the streets, the Nigerian child has experience varying aspects of violence that has challenged his/her overall growth, development and progress. The study examines the impact of indirect and direct violence on the Nigerian child. It submits that in spite of extant legislations meant to protect the Nigerian child, the structure of the Nigerian society arguably makes the Nigerian child vulnerable to hardship, hunger, poverty, exclusion, oppression, marginalization, subordination, intimidation, maltreatment and denial. The study recommends that the Nigerian child should be treated as a security issue demanding immediate attention and responses from the government. 
 
Key words: Nigeria, war, peace, direct violence, indirect violence, development, child.