Journal of
Entomology and Nematology

  • Abbreviation: J. Entomol. Nematol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9855
  • DOI: 10.5897/JEN
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 130

Full Length Research Paper

Contribution of mosquito vectors in malaria transmission in an urban district of Southern Cameroon

Eric Moise Bakwo Fils1,2*, Patrick Akono Ntonga2,3, Philippe Belong4 and Jean Messi2
  1Département des Sciences de la vie et de la Terre, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université de Maroua. P. O. Box 55, Maroua, Cameroun. 2Laboratoire de Zoologie, Département de Biologie et Physiologie Animale, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Yaoundé I, P. O. Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroun. 3Laboratoire de Biologie des Organismes Animaux, Département de Biologie des Organismes Animaux, Faculté des Sciences, Université de Douala, P. O. Box 2701, Douala, Cameroun. 4Département des Sciences Biologiques, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université de Yaoundé I, Cameroun.  
Email: [email protected]

  •  Accepted: 29 June 2010
  •  Published: 30 September 2010

Abstract

 

In order to observe the role of vectors in malaria transmission in an urban area, a 12-month longitudinal entomological survey was conducted from January to December 2007 at Ekombitié, a central district of Ebolowa, south Cameroon. Mosquitoes captured indoors by human volunteers were identified morphologically. Among the 14.468 mosquitoes captured, three vectors were identified: Anophelesgambiae s.l.Anopheles moucheti and Anopheles funestusAgambiae was the most aggressive species with 38.72 bites per human per night. A. gambiae s.l.was the main malaria vector at Ekombitié with 86.72% of total transmission, followed by A. moucheti (12.38%) A. funestus (0.9%). Malaria transmission occurred throughout the year and was due each month to at least two vector species, A. gambiae s.l. (98 infective bites/human/year) and A. moucheti (14 infective bite/human/year) being always involved.

 

Key words: Malaria, transmission, Anopheles gambiae, Ekombitié, Cameroon.