Journal of
Ecology and The Natural Environment

  • Abbreviation: J. Ecol. Nat. Environ.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9847
  • DOI: 10.5897/JENE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 342

Full Length Research Paper

Vulnerability assessment of Gnidia glauca (Thymelaeaceae) exploitation, traditional uses and domestication potential in the community forest of Kilum-Ijim, North Western Cameroon

Marie Louise AVANA-TIENTCHEU
  • Marie Louise AVANA-TIENTCHEU
  • Department of Forestry, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences, University of Dschang, P. O. Box. 222, Dschang, Cameroon.
  • Google Scholar
Marie Caroline MOMO SOLEFACK
  • Marie Caroline MOMO SOLEFACK
  • Laboratoire de Botanique Appliquée (LABOA), Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, P. O. Box. 67, Dschang, University of Dschang, Cameroon.
  • Google Scholar
Yanick Borel KAMGA
  • Yanick Borel KAMGA
  • Laboratoire de Botanique Appliquée (LABOA), Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, P. O. Box. 67, Dschang, University of Dschang, Cameroon.
  • Google Scholar
Victor Francois NGUETSOP
  • Victor Francois NGUETSOP
  • Laboratoire de Botanique Appliquée (LABOA), Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, P. O. Box. 67, Dschang, University of Dschang, Cameroon.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 04 August 2018
  •  Accepted: 07 September 2018
  •  Published: 31 October 2018

Abstract

A study was conducted in the western highland region of Cameroon with the aim to assess sustainability of Gnidia glauca exploitation in its natural habitat. In 33 plots of 40 x 40 m, the unexploited, exploited and dead trees were evaluated for vitality using a multi-criteria vulnerability assessment method. An ethnobotanical survey was conducted with 60 respondents in six villages around Mount Oku area. Data were submitted to ANOVA and means separated using Duncan test. The results revealed that 95 % of G. glauca trees were unexploited and only 3.92% showed signs of exploitation, among which 1.08% were dead. Among the exploited stems, 18% showed a completely dead crown, whereas 73% were described to be regular and healthy. Wood (29%) and bark (28%) were the main products being exploited. However, the species’ bark was the most frequently harvested product (64%). G. glauca was shown to be more vulnerable in forests (2.6) than in savanna (2.4). The motivating factors for the species’ domestication were the fragility of its habitat, the potential high future demand for its products and the unsustainable exploitation techniques being applied. It is therefore recommended to promote the species uses, conservation and cultivation within its national distribution range for local livelihood improvement.

 

Key words: Ethnobotany, Gnidia glauca, sustainable management, vulnerability, Cameroon.