Journal of
Ecology and The Natural Environment

  • Abbreviation: J. Ecol. Nat. Environ.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9847
  • DOI: 10.5897/JENE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 355

Full Length Research Paper

Overhead shading and growth of young longleaf pine

John C. Gilbert
  • John C. Gilbert
  • Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Science, 3301 Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building, Auburn University, AL 36849, United States of America.
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John S. Kush
  • John S. Kush
  • Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Science, 3301 Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building, Auburn University, AL 36849, United States of America.
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Ralph S. Meldahl
  • Ralph S. Meldahl
  • Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Science, 3301 Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building, Auburn University, AL 36849, United States of America.
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William D. Boyer
  • William D. Boyer
  • USDA-Forest Service, G.W. Andrews Forestry Sciences Laboratory, 521 Devall Drive, Auburn, AL 36849-5418, United States of America.
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Dean H. Gjerstad
  • Dean H. Gjerstad
  • USDA-Forest Service, G.W. Andrews Forestry Sciences Laboratory, 521 Devall Drive, Auburn, AL 36849-5418, United States of America.
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  •  Accepted: 30 December 2013
  •  Published: 28 February 2014

Abstract

A study to determine the effects of environmental conditions on the growth of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) was initiated in 1969 on the Escambia Experimental Forest near Brewton, Alabama, USA. This study sample consisted of forty young naturally regenerated, even aged longleaf pine seedlings evenly divided between two soil types. At the beginning of the study, the seedlings were 14 years from seed and ranged in height from 0.8 to 1.5 m. From 1969 to 1970, height and diameter measurements were recorded once to four times weekly during the growing seasons and once a month during the dormant seasons. To test the effects of shading on growth, cheesecloth was suspended over 10 randomly selected seedlings from each soil type only during the first growing season, from March 28 to September 24, 1969. This study provides data from the only known in-field shading experiment with longleaf pine seedlings of this size. The effects of the shading treatment and soil type were evaluated for height and diameter growth. The shading treatment did not have a significant effect on either height or diameter growth, but soil type had a significant effect on diameter growth.

 

Key words: Pinus palustris, longleaf pine, shade, soil type, shade intolerance.