Journal of
Infectious Diseases and Immunity

  • Abbreviation: J. Infect. Dis. Immun.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2375
  • DOI: 10.5897/JIDI
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 80

Review

Assessment of tuberculosis-related knowledge, attitudes and practices in Enugu, South East Nigeria

Onyeonoro Ugochukwu Uchenna*
  • Onyeonoro Ugochukwu Uchenna*
  • Department of Community Medicine, Abia State University, Aba Campus, Aba, Abia State, Nigeria
  • Google Scholar
Chukwu Joseph Ngozi
  • Chukwu Joseph Ngozi
  • German Leprosy and Tuberculosis Relief Association, Enugu, Nigeria
  • Google Scholar
Oshi Daniel C
  • Oshi Daniel C
  • German Leprosy and Tuberculosis Relief Association, Enugu, Nigeria
  • Google Scholar
Nwafor Charles C
  • Nwafor Charles C
  • German Leprosy and Tuberculosis Relief Association, Enugu, Nigeria
  • Google Scholar
Meka Anthony O
  • Meka Anthony O
  • German Leprosy and Tuberculosis Relief Association, Enugu, Nigeria
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 15 March 2011
  •  Accepted: 08 April 2011
  •  Published: 30 April 2014

Abstract

This study was carried out in 2009 to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of tuberculosis (TB) and its socio-demographic determinants in six selected Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Enugu State, South East Nigeria. A total of 1,200 respondents were selected from 6 Local Government Areas by multi-stage sampling technique and responses elicited from them by semi-structured, pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire. Data collected were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17. Awareness of tuberculosis was high (93%) among the households. Primary sources of information were radio (59.1%), community members (29.8%) and television (17.1%). Knowledge of tuberculosis disease was low, except for knowledge of TB symptoms (61.5%). Urban residents had better knowledge of TB than the rural respondents. Most of them believed that TB is curable and would opt for medical consultation, following suspicion of TB. Despite having relatively poorer knowledge of TB, rural communities were less likely to stigmatise against persons with TB (p = 0.000). Urban households had significantly better knowledge of TB and access to TB services (p = 0.000). Educational status of an individual and the spouse, literacy status and religion were significantly associated with TB-related knowledge, attitude and practice. Therefore, socio-demographic factors should be considered in subsequent behavioural changes communications in the country.  
 
Key words: Perception, symptoms, transmission, determinants, Nigeria.