Journal of
Infectious Diseases and Immunity

  • Abbreviation: J. Infect. Dis. Immun.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2375
  • DOI: 10.5897/JIDI
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 81

Full Length Research Paper

Sero-prevalence of malaria, hepatitis b and syphilis among pregnant women in Osogbo, Southwestern Nigeria

Adeleke, M. A.
  • Adeleke, M. A.
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Osun State University, P.M.B 4429, Osogbo, Nigeria.
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Adebimpe, W. O.
  • Adebimpe, W. O.
  • Department of Community Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, Osogbo, Nigeria.
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Sam-Wobo, S. O.
  • Sam-Wobo, S. O.
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria.
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Wahab, A. A.
  • Wahab, A. A.
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Osun State University, P.M.B 4429, Osogbo, Nigeria.
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Akinyosoye, L. S.
  • Akinyosoye, L. S.
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Osun State University, P.M.B 4429, Osogbo, Nigeria.
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Adelowo, T. O.
  • Adelowo, T. O.
  • Department of Biological Sciences, Osun State University, P.M.B 4429, Osogbo, Nigeria.
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  •  Accepted: 02 July 2013
  •  Published: 31 August 2013

Abstract

Malaria, syphilis and Hepatitis B during pregnancy are detrimental to the life of the pregnant women and the foetus. In this study, we documented the prevalence of the three diseases among pregnant women attending a selected Comprehensive Health Care center in Osogbo, Nigeria using serological kits. Of the 200 participants consented to participate in the study, 26 (13%) were positive for malaria while 6 (3%) were positive for Hapatitis B Virus (HBV). The co-infection of malaria and HBV was found only in two participants (1%) while none of the participants was positive for syphilis. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of malaria and Hepatitis B in relation to age (p > 0.05).  All the participants had good knowledge that mosquitoes transmit malaria but only 29 (14.5%) claimed to be sleeping under insecticide treated bed-net. About 169 (84.5%) relied solely on insecticide spray of the room and 2 (1%) did not practice any mosquito control measures. The results may suggest the low prevalence of malaria, Hepatitis B virus and syphilis at the study area. However, early surveillance and adequate public health education will be immeasurable in safe-guiding the pregnant women from the detrimental effects of these infections.

 

Key words: Malaria, syphilis, hepatitis B virus, pregnant women, co-infection, Nigeria.