Journal of
Media and Communication Studies

  • Abbreviation: J. Media Commun. Stud.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2545
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMCS
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 201

Review

Facebook use among Nigerians in Houston Texas USA

Agnes Agbo Monjok
  • Agnes Agbo Monjok
  • Department of Radio Television and Film, School of Communications, Texas Southern University , Houston Texas, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Christian Chinwe Ulasi
  • Christian Chinwe Ulasi
  • Department of Radio Television and Film, School of Communications, Texas Southern University , Houston Texas, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Eui Bun Lee
  • Eui Bun Lee
  • Department of Journalism, School of Communication, Texas Southern University, Houston Texas, USA.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 30 December 2016
  •  Accepted: 13 August 2019
  •  Published: 30 September 2019

Abstract

Social Media came into our world in the 21st century and changed the way things are done, knitting itself into the fabric of everyday living. It has opened the world in ways that was unimagined in previous decades, connecting people through time and space. Being one of the largest immigrant groups in Houston Texas, this study investigates how Nigerians have embraced the new medium as Diasporas. Two Hundred Nigerians were sampled in a survey in Houston, 62% of whom were males and 38% females. While results of the study confirmed a virtual community on Facebook for varied purposes, young adults between the ages of 23-30 years were found to be the most active. The most important reason for using Facebook was to identify with a religious group (88.4%), followed by keeping in close touch with family and friends at home in Nigeria and around the world (813%).  The use of this social medium to promote one’s business was third place with 74.3% of respondents in agreement. The least of these uses was for online dating with 31.9%.  While approximately 65% of respondents also agree that Facebook has no effect on their romantic lives, 78.4% feel this social medium has impacted their friendships positively. There was significant difference in opinion between the genders on the effect of Facebook on relationships. Technology was vital in facilitating everyday use of Facebook.  Results shows 98.4% of respondents have cell phones with internet access.  61% of respondents agree that the identity of being Nigerian is important to them. The study affirms the relevance of uses and gratification as a theory for the new media.

 

Key words: Facebook use, social media, Nigerians, Diaspora community, Houston.