Journal of
Parasitology and Vector Biology

  • Abbreviation: J. Parasitol. Vector Biol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2510
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPVB
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 185

Full Length Research Paper

Community implementation of human landing and non-human landing collection methods for Wuchereria bancrofti vectors

Simon P. Sawadogo
  • Simon P. Sawadogo
  • Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé//Direction Régionale de l'Ouest, Bobo-Dioulasso BP 545, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Achille S. Nikiema
  • Achille S. Nikiema
  • Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé//Direction Régionale de l'Ouest, Bobo-Dioulasso BP 545, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Sanata Coulibal
  • Sanata Coulibal
  • Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé//Direction Régionale de l'Ouest, Bobo-Dioulasso BP 545, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Lassane Koala
  • Lassane Koala
  • Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé//Direction Régionale de l'Ouest, Bobo-Dioulasso BP 545, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Abdoulaye Niang
  • Abdoulaye Niang
  • Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé//Direction Régionale de l'Ouest, Bobo-Dioulasso BP 545, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Clarisse Bougouma
  • Clarisse Bougouma
  • Programme National de lutte contre les Maladies Tropicales Négligées, Ministère de la Santé, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Roland W. Bougma
  • Roland W. Bougma
  • Programme National de lutte contre les Maladies Tropicales Négligées, Ministère de la Santé, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Olivier Gnankine
  • Olivier Gnankine
  • Department of Animal Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Life and Earth Sciences, Université Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar
Frances M. Hawkes
  • Frances M. Hawkes
  • Department of Agriculture, Health and Environment, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich at Medway, Chatham, Kent, ME4 4TB, UK.
  • Google Scholar
Daniel Boakye
  • Daniel Boakye
  • Department of Parasitology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Roch K. Dabire
  • Roch K. Dabire
  • Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Santé//Direction Régionale de l'Ouest, Bobo-Dioulasso BP 545, Burkina Faso.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 31 December 2020
  •  Accepted: 19 February 2021
  •  Published: 31 May 2021

Abstract

In the drive towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis, enhanced surveillance of vector mosquitoes requires sound sampling methods which can be easily implemented and accepted by communities. Several tools have been validated as alternatives to human landing catches (HLC) for this purpose, but little is known about their effectiveness compared to HLC in terms of the vector density patterns. This study aimed at assessing the efficiency of four mosquitoes collecting tools (HLC, Center for Diseases Control (CDC) light trap, Double Net trap, Window Exit trap). These four sampling tools were evaluated in three different villages (Bapla, Ouessa and Koudjo) in Burkina Faso, when mosquito collection was managed by local people in each community. The results showed that HLC remained the most effective collection method in terms of vector abundance in all villages, followed by double net traps. Except in Bapla, the double net trap collected more Anopheles than CDC light traps. Across the study, the prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti infection was estimated to be 0.6% and observed only in Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. The Double Net trap is the least expensive of all three methods and was well accepted by the community. In conclusion, double net traps can be recommended for communities to use for lymphatic filariasis (LF) vector surveillance program for xeno-monitoring of post transmission assessment survey evaluation. Based on prevalence the mass drug administration (MDA) could be stopped in these villages without risk of resurgence of the disease, according to the current recommendations of World Health Organization (WHO). Set up surveillance and continue to use vector control tools.

Key words: Lymphatic filariasis, Wuchereria bancrofti, mosquitoes, community surveillance, Burkina Faso.