Journal of
Parasitology and Vector Biology

  • Abbreviation: J. Parasitol. Vector Biol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2510
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPVB
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 168

Article in Press

PREVALANCE OF INTESTINAL PARASITES USING FORMOL ETHER CONCENTRATION TECHNIQUE AND ITS ASSOCIATING FACTORS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN DAWUDO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, DESSIE, NORTH-EAST ETHIOPIA.

TegenawTiruneh*1,Tahir Eyayu1,TesfayeAndualem1,BekeleSharew2, HaftayHaileselasie2

  •  Received: 25 December 2016
  •  Accepted: 13 February 2017
Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are widely distributed throughout the world and constitute for the global health burden causing clinical morbidity and mortality mainly in developing countries including Ethiopia. WHO estimates that a minimum of 25% the world’s population is chronically infected with intestinal parasites and 1.5to 2.7 million deaths annually. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites using formal ether concentration technique and its associated risk factors among Dawudo elementary school children. Method: Cross sectional study was conducted in Dawudo elementary school children from March to April; 2015. By using systematic random sampling technique a total of 236 school children were enrolled. Using pre-tested structured questionnaire socio-demographic data of the participants and possible factors for the occurrence of intestinal parasitic infections were collected. Approximately 2 gram of stool specimens were collected and examined using wet mount and formal ether concentration technique. Data analyses were done by using SPSS version 16 software. In all cases p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results:The overall prevalence of intestinal parasite was 66.5 % (157/236). From the total positive infected with intestinal parasites, 132 (84.1%), 21 (13.4%) and 4(2.5%) had single, double and triple infections, respectively. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most common intestinal parasite 134 (56.8%), followed by E.histolytica/dispar23(9.7%).In this study the use of latrine, hand washing habit before and after eating, open defecation, finger nail status, and habit of eating raw vegetables were statistically significantly correlated with intestinal parasites. Conclusion:Intestinal parasitic infection in the study area was highly prevalent and this is a public health problem. Therefore, an intervention strategy that focuses on provision of adequate and safe water supply, periodic deworming and health education should be designed and implemented in the area to reduce this high prevalence.

Keywords: Prevalence, intestinal parasites