African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6576

Full Length Research Paper

Physical fractionation of soil organic matter under different land use systems

Paulo Robson Mansor
  • Paulo Robson Mansor
  • Instituto Federal de Educação do Espírito Santo, Rua Principal S/N, Distrito de Rive, Caixa Postal 47, Alegre, ES, Brazil, CEP: 29500-000, Brazil.
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Henrique Duarte Vieira
  • Henrique Duarte Vieira
  • Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Agropecuárias, Av. Alberto Lamego 2000, Parque Califórnia, CEP 28013-602 Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil.
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Otacílio José Passos Rangel
  • Otacílio José Passos Rangel
  • Instituto Federal de Educação do Espírito Santo, Rua Principal S/N, Distrito de Rive, Caixa Postal 47, Alegre, ES, Brazil, CEP: 29500-000, Brazil.
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Fábio Luiz Partelli*
  • Fábio Luiz Partelli*
  • Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Centro Universitário Norte do Espírito Santo. Rod. BR 101 Norte km 60, Litorâneo, CEP 29932-540, São Mateus, ES, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 25 October 2013
  •  Accepted: 16 April 2014
  •  Published: 08 May 2014

Abstract

A sustainable management of soil organic matter is fundamental for the maintenance of the soil productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the contents and storage of the fractions of the soil organic matter under different management systems compared to the native vegetation as reference in a Red-yellow Latosol in the southern region of the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. The applied treatments consisted of four land use systems: native forest, annual crop, perennial crop and pasture. Samples were taken from 0 to 10 cm layer for the physical fractionation of soil organic matter, analyzing the amount of total organic carbon and carbon in the light and heavy fraction determining the storage of carbon in the light and heavy fraction. In the native forest, the amounts and storage of carbon were the highest, both in the light and heavy fraction showing stability in the soil carbon reserve. The light fractions of the soil organic matter are more sensitive to the management of the land use systems than the heavy fraction and total organic carbon.

Key words: Soil tillage, agroecosystems, organic carbon.