African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6578

Full Length Research Paper

Impact of climate change on the incidences of small ruminant diseases in a pastoral area of Kenya

B. Moenga
  • B. Moenga
  • Department of Veterinary Services, Kabete VetLabs, P. O. Private bag, 00625, Kangemi, Kenya.
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G. Muchemi
  • G. Muchemi
  • College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya.
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E. K. Kang’ethe
  • E. K. Kang’ethe
  • College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya.
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J. W. Kimenju
  • J. W. Kimenju
  • College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya.
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E. R. Mutiga
  • E. R. Mutiga
  • College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya.
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G. O. Matete
  • G. O. Matete
  • Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, Ngecha Rd Offices Off Lower Kabete Road, Nairobi, Kenya.
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  •  Received: 15 May 2012
  •  Accepted: 17 March 2016
  •  Published: 07 July 2016

Abstract

Participatory epidemiological methods were used to establish local perceptions and livestock owner’s knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) of risk factors that impacts of climate variability and the seasonal variations in incidences of livestock diseases, disease vectors, intermediate hosts and rainfall in pastoral Rift valley of Kenya. The interaction of the molecular biology of the pathogen itself; vectors (if any); farming practice, land use; zoological and environmental factors; and the establishment of new microenvironments and microclimates were important in forecasting how contagious caprine pleuronemonia, enterotoxaemia and sheep and goat pox occurred. Thus, the future for traditional pastoralists is depressing if they depend on an environment that may no longer support them. A risk assessment framework is proposedwas used, to examine factors based on modules that accommodate these factors. Risk assessments focused on examining the combinations of factors directly affected by climate change or indirectly by human activity, such as land use (e.g. deforestation), transport and movement of animals, intensity of livestock farming and habitat change and their relationship with should be done. This used to screen for the emergence of unexpected disease events. The present study recommended implementing disease management practices and policy measures to mitigate the impact of climate variability on the spread of livestock diseases.

Key words: Climate change, participatory epidemiology, incidences of small ruminant diseases, pastoral areas.