African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6559

Full Length Research Paper

Smallholder adoption of soil and water conservation techniques in Ghana

Abdallah Abdul-Hanan
  • Abdallah Abdul-Hanan
  • Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Michael Ayamga
  • Michael Ayamga
  • Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar
Samuel A. Donkoh
  • Samuel A. Donkoh
  • Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Accepted: 04 December 2013
  •  Published: 22 January 2014

Abstract

At the onset of climate change, the adoption of soil and water conservation (SWC) techniques in Africa sub of the Sahara has become even more crucial. The study aimed at estimating the determinants and effects of SWC adoption. The data was obtained from the Ghana Agriculture Production Survey (GAPS), a national level survey conducted by Ghana’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture with technical and financial support from the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). A total sample size of 1,530 farm households selected from 20 districts across Ghana was used. The Poisson model was employed to estimate the determinants of adoption of SWC technology while the stochastic frontier model was used to analyze the effects of SWC technology adoption on technical efficiency. The study found that SWC adoption significantly affected technical efficiency in maize production. Significant policy variables that were found to positively influence the adoption of SWC techniques included credit, farm size, group membership and proximity to input sale points. Also, credit, education and extension services significantly influenced farmers’ technical efficiency. There is the need for a holist approach to supporting farmers. In general, access to education, extension services and credit must be stepped up. Farmers must also be supported to form farm groups as a viable source of farm labour.

 

Key words: Adoption, poisson model, technical efficiency, soil and water conservation.