African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6574

Full Length Research Paper

Chemical properties of soils in agroforestry homegardens and other land use systems in Eastern Amazon, Brazil

Thiago Almeida Vieira
  • Thiago Almeida Vieira
  • Federal University of Western Pará, Av. Vera Paz, s/n, Salé, Santarém, CEP 68.035-110, Brazil.
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Leonilde dos Santos Rosa
  • Leonilde dos Santos Rosa
  • Federal Rural University of Amazon, Av. Tancredo Neves, 2501, Terra Firme, Belém, CEP 66.077-830, Brazil.
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Maria Marly de Lourdes Silva Santos
  • Maria Marly de Lourdes Silva Santos
  • Federal Rural University of Amazon, Av. Tancredo Neves, 2501, Terra Firme, Belém, CEP 66.077-830, Brazil.
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Clodoaldo Alcino Andrade dos Santos
  • Clodoaldo Alcino Andrade dos Santos
  • Federal University of Western Pará, Av. Vera Paz, s/n, Salé, Santarém, CEP 68.035-110, Brazil.
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Denise Castro Lustosa
  • Denise Castro Lustosa
  • Federal University of Western Pará, Av. Vera Paz, s/n, Salé, Santarém, CEP 68.035-110, Brazil.
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Alan Péricles Amaral dos Santos
  • Alan Péricles Amaral dos Santos
  • Pará State Technical Assistance and Rural Extension Company, BR 316, Km 12, Marituba, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 23 March 2016
  •  Accepted: 16 May 2016
  •  Published: 21 July 2016

Abstract

Homegardens are considered as an alternative to preserve and/or restore the fertility and productivity of degraded soils. The assessment of changes in soil chemical properties resulting from land use and management is important to understand these changes and allow a rational intervention to ensure production on a sustainable basis. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the soil chemical properties of homegardens and other systems of land use, as well as to identify the factors that influence fertility in areas of family farming in the municipality of Bonito, Eastern Amazon. Three soil samples were collected from secondary forest, cassava (Manihot esculenta) monoculture, silvopastoral systems and homegardens, from the depth range of 0-20 cm, and were evaluated in a completely randomized design with 12 treatments and three replications. The data were subjected to analysis of variance with the Kruskal-Wallis test, correlation analysis and principal component analysis. The variables studied, except Mg and Ca, were influenced by the soil cover. The homegardens, agricultural monoculture and silvopastoral systems were similar to the secondary forest in terms of nutrient cycling, with the exception of one 35-year-old homegarden, where the levels of P and K were higher. The soil fertility was explained by three factors: soil nutrients and salinity (P, K and Na); soil acidity and aluminum toxicity (Ca, Al, Mg, and pH); and by soil organic matter (SOM).
 
 
Key words: Soil cover, agroforestry systems, tropical soils, family agriculture, Amazon region.