African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6576

Full Length Research Paper

Microbial load of processed Parkia biglobosa seeds: Towards enhanced shelf life

I. T. Ademola
  • I. T. Ademola
  • Forest Product Development and Utilization Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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R. A. Baiyewu
  • R. A. Baiyewu
  • Forest Product Development and Utilization Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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E. A. Adekunle
  • E. A. Adekunle
  • Biotechnology Laboratory, Sustainable Forest Management Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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A. B. Awe
  • A. B. Awe
  • Forest Product Development and Utilization Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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O. J. Adewumi
  • O. J. Adewumi
  • Forest Product Development and Utilization Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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O. O. Ayodele
  • O. O. Ayodele
  • Forest Product Development and Utilization Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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F. J. Oluwatoke
  • F. J. Oluwatoke
  • Forest Product Development and Utilization Department, Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P. M. B. 5054, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.
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  •  Accepted: 28 August 2012
  •  Published: 31 January 2013

Abstract

 

Parkia biglobosa seed is one of the major sources of plant protein in African diet. This work was carried out to improve the shelf-life of the processed seeds of P. biglobosa. The microbial count of the micro-organisms (responsible for the fermentation of the processed seed), sensory and physical characteristics were evaluated on fermented seeds preserved with various salt concentration. Our results show that the microbial load was the least in the group with the highest salt concentration at ration 10:3 g/g. Statistical analysis shows a significant difference in the number of colonies formed between the groups at (p < 0.05). Salting, as observed in this work, reduced the microbial load, discourage quick spoilage, and encourage longer shelf-life of processed P. biglobosa seed in concentration dependent manner.

 

Key words: Parkia biglobosa, microbial load, African diet, shelf-life, salting.