African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6340

Full Length Research Paper

Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on survival and growth of micropropagated Comanthera mucugensis spp. mucugensis (Eriocaulaceae)

Lidiane Silva Pereira
  • Lidiane Silva Pereira
  • Department of Biological Sciences, State University of Santa Cruz, 45662-900, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil
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Irailde da Silva Santos
  • Irailde da Silva Santos
  • Department of Biological Sciences, State University of Feira de Santana, UEFS, Feira de Santana, 44036-900 Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil
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Fátima Cerqueira Alvim
  • Fátima Cerqueira Alvim
  • Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, State University of Santa Cruz, 45662-900, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil
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José Olimpio de Souza Júnior
  • José Olimpio de Souza Júnior
  • Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, State University of Santa Cruz, 45662-900, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil
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Eduardo Gross
  • Eduardo Gross
  • Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, State University of Santa Cruz, 45662-900, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil
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  •  Received: 09 November 2016
  •  Accepted: 19 January 2017
  •  Published: 18 May 2017

Abstract

The use of micropropagation technique has been an alternative to conservation of endangered species, Comanthera mucugensis subsp. mucugensis (popular namely sempre viva de Mucuge); however, there is no information on the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the acclimation process of micropropagated plants. This study evaluated the survival, growth and nutritional aspects of the species, C. mucugensis subsp. mucugensis inoculated with native AMFs in greenhouse condition. The design of the experiment consisted initially of 80 sampling units divided into four treatments: plants inoculated with native AMF, with microbiota filtrate from soil, with AMF plus filtrate and control (non-inoculated plants). At three and eleven-month-old, the plants were collected for evaluation of growth, nutrition and mycorrhizal colonization. After eleven months of experiment, survival rate of AMF and AMF plus filtrate plants were 62.5 and 87.5%, respectively, and only one microbiota filtrate and one control plants survived. AMF inoculation also provided increase in n dry matter of rosettes and permitted obtaining flowering ten-month-growth plants. Rates of mycorrhizal colonization were high at three (aproximately 64.9%) and eleven (aproximately 94.5%) months for AMF and AMF plus filtrate plants. Number of spores in rhizosphere soil of mycorrhizal plants was also high (1599 per 100 dm3 of soil) and seven diferent species of AMF were identified at the end of experiment. Data set evidenced mycortrophic character of C. mucugensis subsp. mucugensis and the importance of AMF inoculation for acclimation and survival of microprogagated plants which is essential for conservation of this endangered plant.

 

Key words: Micropropagation, nutrition, arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, sempre viva de Mucuge, aclimatation