African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6559

Full Length Research Paper

Effect of linear view approach of weed management in agro-ecosystem: A review

Gideon K. Muli
  • Gideon K. Muli
  • African Center of Excellence in Agroecology and Livelihood System, Faculty of Agriculture, Uganda Martyrs University, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Samuel O. Apori
  • Samuel O. Apori
  • African Center of Excellence in Agroecology and Livelihood System, Faculty of Agriculture, Uganda Martyrs University, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Joseph Ssekandi
  • Joseph Ssekandi
  • Faculty of Agriculture, Uganda Martyrs University, Uganda.
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Marius Murongo
  • Marius Murongo
  • African Center of Excellence in Agroecology and Livelihood System, Faculty of Agriculture, Uganda Martyrs University, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Emmanuel Hanyabui
  • Emmanuel Hanyabui
  • Department of Soil Science, University of Cape Coast, Ghana.
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  •  Received: 15 October 2020
  •  Accepted: 18 December 2020
  •  Published: 28 February 2021

Abstract

Weeds are considered a pest that is detrimental to human interest. Weeds compete with cultivated and desirable plants for space, soil nutrient, and sunlight and soil moisture thereby reducing crop productivity. Weeds also serve as a host for pests and pathogens that cause plant diseases. Weeds typically produce large numbers of seeds, assisting their spread, and rapidly invade disturbed sites. Seeds spread into natural and disturbed environments, via wind, waterways, people, vehicles, machinery, birds and other animals. To prevent the effect of weeds on crop productivity, farmers mostly use a linear approach for weed management. The linear view approach aims at eradicating weeds without concern about the environment. This paper reviews the effects of the linear view approach of weed management in the agro-ecosystem. A review using forty-one articles reveals that herbicides application, bush burning and soil tillage are the most often used linear view approach for controlling weeds in the farm ecosystem. The paper highlights the contribution of these weed control methods to climate change through loss of biodiversity, pollution of water bodies, soil degradation, deterioration of fruit quality and release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

Key words: Herbicides, biodiversity, bush burning, soil tillage.