African Journal of
Food Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Food Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0794
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJFS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 839

Full Length Research Paper

Toxicological evaluation of the effect of Clarias gariepinus (African catfish) cultivated in water contaminated with phthalate, benzene and cyclohexane on liver of albino rats

O. Adeyemi1*, C. C. Osubor1 and O. Adeyemi2
  1Department of Biochemistry, University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria. 2Department of Environmental Sciences, Federal University of Petroleum Resources Effurun, Delta State, Nigeria.
Email: [email protected]

  •  Accepted: 16 November 2009
  •  Published: 31 January 2010

Abstract

 

Effect of consuming Clarias gariepinus cultivated in water contaminated with (10 μg/ml) respectively of phthalate, benzene and cyclohexane on the liver of rats was done. Serum concentrations of bilirubin, globulin and albumin were determined. Standard enzyme assays were conducted for selected liver enzymes followed by histological examination of liver section. Serum albumin and globulin concentrations were found to be significantly lower in rats fed with contaminated C. gariepinus than control (p < 0.05). Generally, activity of enzymes in the liver of experimental rats was found to be significantly lower than that of control (p < 0.05). Particularly, activities of alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases in the liver of rats fed with C. gariepinus cultivated in phthalate contaminated water were found to be (9.1±1.7, 113.8±6, 13.4±0.9, 20.4 ± 0.9) nmol/min/mg protein respectively while those of control were (16.8 ± 2.2, 177.9 ± 5, 16.4 ± 1.3, 23.7±1.2) nmol/min/mg protein. Serum concentrations of direct and total bilirubin of rats fed with C. gariepinus cultivated in benzene contaminated water were found to be (3.52 ± 0.05, 9.24 ± 0.50) mg/dl respectively while those of control were found to be (1.06±0.02, 4.93 ± 0.20) mg/dl respectively.Histological examination of section revealed distorted cellular arrangement in the liver section of rats fed with contaminated fish relative to control. Experimental evidences from this study suggest hepatotoxicity which may predispose to tissue failure. Increasing cases of liver problem in Nigeria may not be unconnected, inta alia, with consumption of fish from contaminated water.

 

Key words: Enzymes, bilirubin, phthalate, hepatotoxicity.