African Journal of
Political Science and International Relations

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Pol. Sci. Int. Relat.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0832
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPSIR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 382

Full Length Research Paper

Climate change and feminist environmentalism in the Niger Delta, Nigeria

Luke A. Amadi
  • Luke A. Amadi
  • Department of Political Science and Administrative Studies, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.
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Mina M. Ogbanga
  • Mina M. Ogbanga
  • Department of Sociology, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.
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James E. Agena
  • James E. Agena
  • Department of Political Science, Ebonyi State University Abakaliki, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 20 April 2015
  •  Accepted: 15 July 2015
  •  Published: 30 September 2015

Abstract

Feminist environmentalist debate explores possible linkages between women and environmental issues such as inequality. One of the most pressing global problem at the centre of this debate is climate change vulnerability. As the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) creates global policy awareness on the realities of climate change vulnerability, women in the poor coastal regions of the periphery societies such as the Niger Delta, Nigeria, prone to environmental degradation seem to be missing out. This subject matter has been of immense policy concern. The increase in recent decades of environmental disasters, deleterious effects of oil resource exploitation by the Multinational Corporations (MNCs), pollution, gas flaring, acid rain, sea level rise, ozone layer depletion, global warming and related pressures, provide the need to explore feminist environmental challenges. As all such problems manifest with divergent climate related implications, the most fundamental challenge they pose to women seem less talked about. Niger Delta women who are largely bread winners in most rural households are at risk as their subsistence relies heavily on the natural environment such as farming, fishing, petty trading, gathering of periwinkles, oysters, crayfish etc. To explore this dynamic, the study deployed a desk review of relevant secondary data to examine possible linkages between feminist environmentalism and climate change mitigation. Findings suggest that climate change, mitigation has been minimal. The paper made some policy recommendations.

 

Key words: Environmental security, climate change, women, development, Niger Delta