International Journal of
Nutrition and Metabolism

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Nutr. Metab.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2332
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJNAM
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 113

Full Length Research Paper

Resting and activity-related energy expenditure:Do formerly overweight women differ from their ever-lean counterparts?

David John Hume
  • David John Hume
  • UCT/MRC Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, P.O. Box 115, Newlands, 7725, South Africa.
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Jacolene Kroff
  • Jacolene Kroff
  • UCT/MRC Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, P.O. Box 115, Newlands, 7725, South Africa.
  • Google Scholar
Estelle Victoria Lambert
  • Estelle Victoria Lambert
  • UCT/MRC Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, P.O. Box 115, Newlands, 7725, South Africa.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Accepted: 19 November 2013
  •  Published: 31 December 2013

Abstract

Weight loss relapse is common in reduced-overweight and reduced-obese persons. It is unclear whether adaptations in resting metabolism and activity-related thermogenesis may result in energy-sparing, thereby contributing to weight regain. We compared resting and daily activity-related energy expenditure in formerly overweight women (maintaining weight losses of ≥ 5%) to normal-weight, weight-stable women matched for body mass index (BMI) and age. Reduced-overweight (RO) and normal-weight (NW) women (N = 44) completed questionnaires for weight history, eating and physical activity behaviors. Measures included: BMI, body composition (bioelectrical impedance), resting energy expenditure and substrate oxidation, and daily activity-related energy expenditure (accelerometry). Groups were comparable for habitual energy intake, resting energy expenditure, resting fat and carbohydrate oxidation and daily activity-related thermogenesis. The RO group significantly over-estimated daily moderate intensity activity-related energy expenditure (270 min/wk) whereas the NW group did not (113 min/wk) (P = 0.02). Energy expenditure (resting and activity-related) was comparable in RO and NW women. With the exception of over-reporting moderate intensity physical activity, our findings suggest that formerly overweight women do not exhibit energy-sparing adaptations increasing the likelihood of weight regain.

Key words: Weight loss, weight regain, energy expenditure, fat oxidation, self-report, physical activity.