International Journal of
Plant Physiology and Biochemistry

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Plant Physiol. Biochem.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2162
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJPPB
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 109

Full Length Research Paper

Vegetative propagation of Echinops giganteus using stem and root cuttings

Christiana Ngyete Nyikob Mbogue
  • Christiana Ngyete Nyikob Mbogue
  • Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon.
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Anjah Mendi Grace
  • Anjah Mendi Grace
  • Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon.
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Nkemnkeng Francoline Jong
  • Nkemnkeng Francoline Jong
  • Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon.
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  •  Received: 17 October 2020
  •  Accepted: 23 November 2020
  •  Published: 30 April 2021

Abstract

Echinops giganteus (Asteraceae) is a shrub native to Cameroon. As part of a recovery effort focused on Echinops giganteus, a vegetative propagation technique was developed. Plants were vegetatively propagated in and out of a non-midst propagator, juvenile stem and root cuttings from the nursery and plant growth regulator hormones of concentrations: 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 10 g/L. The effect of the cutting positions from the mother plant (apical, medial and basal) and concentration of growth hormones (indole butyric acid and naphthaleneacetic acid) on rooting success were evaluated. Cuttings were dipped in into a commercial insecticide commonly called EAGROW before putting it into hormone concentrations; the dilution media for hormones was alcohol. Rooting occurred with and without auxin treatments but was greatest in the control concentrations (just alcohol) for both hormones; rooting was lowest when hormone concentrations were greater than 3 g/L. Rooting success was evaluated two months after the experiments were started. None of the stem cuttings survived. The control root head cuttings in the propagator had the lowest mortality rates than (NAA 11% and IBA 33%). The trails out of the propagator hard a 0% mortality rate. Vegetative propagation of E. giganteus will allow its large-scale regeneration for a sustainable management plan.

 

Key words: Vegetative propagation, stem and root cuttings, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), ∝-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).