Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3641

Full Length Research Paper

Preliminary study to identify anti-sickle cell plants in Niger's traditional pharmacopoeia and their phytochemicals

Amadou Tidjani Ilagouma
  • Amadou Tidjani Ilagouma
  • Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Techniques, Abdou Moumouni University of Niamey, Niger.
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Issoufou Amadou
  • Issoufou Amadou
  • Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Environment Sciences, Dan Dicko Dankoulodo University of Maradi, Niger.
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Hamo Issaka
  • Hamo Issaka
  • Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Techniques, Abdou Moumouni University of Niamey, Niger.
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Oumalhéri Amadou Tidjani Ilagouma
  • Oumalhéri Amadou Tidjani Ilagouma
  • Regional Center for Specialized Agricultural Training (CRESA), Faculty of Agronomy, Abdou Moumouni University of Niamey, Niger.
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Khalid Ikhiri
  • Khalid Ikhiri
  • Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Techniques, Abdou Moumouni University of Niamey, Niger.
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  •  Received: 04 September 2019
  •  Accepted: 04 November 2019
  •  Published: 31 December 2019

Abstract

The management of sickle cell disease is a major challenge at the international level. In many African countries, sickle cell anemia is one of the major causes of mortality and is a critical public health problem in Niger. In this part of the continent, the estimated prevalence is around 18 to 22%, which is amongst the highest in Africa. Nowadays, despite the existence of some ways to improve the prognosis of sickle cell anemia as allograft, it turns out that these resources are expensive and out of reach of underdeveloped countries. The purpose of this study was to identify the preliminary anti-sickle cell plants in Niger's traditional pharmacopoeia. To do this, an ethnobotanical survey was conducted among the patients consulting the National Reference Center for Sickle Cell Disease (CNRD) and the traditional healers in the city of Niamey. At the end of this survey, 29 plant species were identified. The phytochemical study of 12 plants showed the presence of large chemical groups known for important biological properties (polyphenols, alkaloids, gallic tannins, sterols and polyterpenes).

Key words: Phytochemical study, sickle cell disease, Niger, medicinal plants, ethnobotanical survey.