Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3672

Full Length Research Paper

Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used by local people in Menz Gera Midir District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia

Seble W. Yohannis
  • Seble W. Yohannis
  • Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Debre Markos University, P.O. Box 269, Debre Markos, Ethiopia.
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Zemede Asfaw
  • Zemede Asfaw
  • Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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Ensermu Kelbessa
  • Ensermu Kelbessa
  • Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 07 June 2018
  •  Accepted: 18 July 2018
  •  Published: 10 August 2018

Abstract

This study was conducted in Menz Gera Midir (Ethiopia) to document medicinal plants and related indigenous knowledge of local people. Data were collected from 72 (12 of them key) informants using semi-structured interview, group discussion and guided field walk. Priority ranking, paired comparison and direct matrix ranking were used in data analysis. A total of 155 medicinal plant species, 104 (67.1%) from natural vegetation and 51 (32.9%) from home gardens were collected. From the total species, 115 were reported to cure only human diseases, 10 species for livestock ailments and 30 for both. Asteraceae contributed 16 species and ranked first followed by Lamiaceae with 12 species. Frequently used plant parts were leaves (43.9%) and roots (31%). The recurrent mode of preparation was pounding (27.9%) followed by powdering (16%) and mostly administrated through oral drinking (33%) and dermal cream (15.7%). Paired comparison revealed that Cucurbita pepo was the most preferred species to treat headache. However, Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata was reported as the most multipurpose plant species. Priority ranking indicated that Lupinus albus was the rarest medicinal plant in the study area. The medicinal plant resources of the area were threatened by agricultural expansion, charcoal making, firewood collection and overgrazing.

Key words: Ethnobotany, indigenous knowledge, medicinal plants, Menz Gera Midir.