Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3707

Full Length Research Paper

Medicinal plants used in ethnoveterinary practices in the Federal Capital Territory, North-Central Nigeria

Lateef Ariyo Adeniran
  • Lateef Ariyo Adeniran
  • Department of Physiology/Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Abuja, Nigeria.
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Smart Okpi
  • Smart Okpi
  • Department of Physiology/Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Abuja, Nigeria.
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Toba Samuel Anjorin
  • Toba Samuel Anjorin
  • Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Abuja, Nigeria.
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Olatunde Peter Ajagbonna
  • Olatunde Peter Ajagbonna
  • Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Abuja, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 28 April 2020
  •  Accepted: 05 June 2020
  •  Published: 31 August 2020

Abstract

A survey of medicinal plants used in ethnoveterinary practices (EVP) was conducted in Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria to document the indigenous use of this plant in the management of animal diseases. Data were collected from fifty informants which included seven traditional medical practitioners and 43 pastoralists using a structured questionnaire. A total of 31 plant species from 25 families were recorded from the study area. The result showed that 86% of the pastoralist practiced EVP, 64% claimed high proficiency though 75% of the pastoralist age between 20 and 39 years were either low in proficiency in EVP. Also, 58% use EVP regularly while only 14% did not use EVP at all in treating health conditions in their herds. The percentage of plant families used in ethnoveterinary practices in descending order was Fabaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Poaceae, and Solanaceae. Momordica charantia and Carica papaya were mostly cited by the informants with the high relative frequency of citation (RFC), 0.70 and 0.62, respectively. Medicinal plants used in treating diarrhea were having common agreement by most of the informants with informant consensus factor (ICF), 0.90. This study provides plant species used in ethnoveterinary practices in Federal Capital Territory (FCT) for further scientific exploration.

Key words: Ethnoveterinary practice, survey; medicinal plants, Nigeria.