Journal of
Plant Breeding and Crop Science

  • Abbreviation: J. Plant Breed. Crop Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9758
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPBCS
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 335

Full Length Research Paper

Combining ability for beta-carotene and important quantitative traits in a cassava f1 population

Njenga, Peninah
  • Njenga, Peninah
  • Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Edema, Richard
  • Edema, Richard
  • Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda.
  • Google Scholar
Kamau, Joseph
  • Kamau, Joseph
  • Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, P.O Box 340-90100 Machakos, Kenya.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 29 October 2012
  •  Accepted: 26 February 2014
  •  Published: 28 February 2014

Abstract

 Cassava is ideal for biofortification due to its popularity as a root staple among populations with high vitamin A malnutrition. The crop is vegetatively propagated and retains the enhanced trait across generations. The combining ability for beta-carotene content and important yield trait was evaluated in a cassava F1 generation. Ten high beta-carotene clones from International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) were hybridized with ten local clones in a North Carolina Design II mating design. The F1 population was evaluated at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). A total of 125 families were evaluated, including 35 reciprocal crosses. The IITA parents had highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) General Combining Ability (GCA) for pulp colour and plant height. The GCA of the local parents was significant (P≤ 0.05) for harvest index, number of lobes (P≤ 0.05) and for plant height (P≤ 0.001). The Specific Combining Ability (SCA) was significant for harvest index and plant height at P≤ 0.05 and P≤ 0.001 respectively. Root pulp colour was influenced by both additive and non-additive genetic effects. There were also maternal effects associated with the trait. Results indicated that local cassava varieties can be improved for beta-carotene content without a decline in agronomic performance.

 

Key words:  Malnutrition, biofortification, phenotyping, Kenya.       

 

 Cassava is ideal for biofortification due to its popularity as a root staple among populations with high vitamin A malnutrition. The crop is vegetatively propagated and retains the enhanced trait across generations. The combining ability for beta-carotene content and important yield trait was evaluated in a cassava F1 generation. Ten high beta-carotene clones from International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) were hybridized with ten local clones in a North Carolina Design II mating design. The F1 population was evaluated at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). A total of 125 families were evaluated, including 35 reciprocal crosses. The IITA parents had highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) General Combining Ability (GCA) for pulp colour and plant height. The GCA of the local parents was significant (P≤ 0.05) for harvest index, number of lobes (P≤ 0.05) and for plant height (P≤ 0.001). The Specific Combining Ability (SCA) was significant for harvest index and plant height at P≤ 0.05 and P≤ 0.001 respectively. Root pulp colour was influenced by both additive and non-additive genetic effects. There were also maternal effects associated with the trait. Results indicated that local cassava varieties can be improved for beta-carotene content without a decline in agronomic performance.

Key words:  Malnutrition, biofortification, phenotyping, Kenya.

 

 

 

 Cassava is ideal for biofortification due to its popularity as a root staple among populations with high vitamin A malnutrition. The crop is vegetatively propagated and retains the enhanced trait across generations. The combining ability for beta-carotene content and important yield trait was evaluated in a cassava F1 generation. Ten high beta-carotene clones from International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) were hybridized with ten local clones in a North Carolina Design II mating design. The F1 population was evaluated at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). A total of 125 families were evaluated, including 35 reciprocal crosses. The IITA parents had highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) General Combining Ability (GCA) for pulp colour and plant height. The GCA of the local parents was significant (P≤ 0.05) for harvest index, number of lobes (P≤ 0.05) and for plant height (P≤ 0.001). The Specific Combining Ability (SCA) was significant for harvest index and plant height at P≤ 0.05 and P≤ 0.001 respectively. Root pulp colour was influenced by both additive and non-additive genetic effects. There were also maternal effects associated with the trait. Results indicated that local cassava varieties can be improved for beta-carotene content without a decline in agronomic performance.

Key words:  Malnutrition, biofortification, phenotyping, Kenya.

 

 

 

         

 

 Cassava is ideal for biofortification due to its popularity as a root staple among populations with high vitamin A malnutrition. The crop is vegetatively propagated and retains the enhanced trait across generations. The combining ability for beta-carotene content and important yield trait was evaluated in a cassava F1 generation. Ten high beta-carotene clones from International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) were hybridized with ten local clones in a North Carolina Design II mating design. The F1 population was evaluated at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). A total of 125 families were evaluated, including 35 reciprocal crosses. The IITA parents had highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) General Combining Ability (GCA) for pulp colour and plant height. The GCA of the local parents was significant (P≤ 0.05) for harvest index, number of lobes (P≤ 0.05) and for plant height (P≤ 0.001). The Specific Combining Ability (SCA) was significant for harvest index and plant height at P≤ 0.05 and P≤ 0.001 respectively. Root pulp colour was influenced by both additive and non-additive genetic effects. There were also maternal effects associated with the trait. Results indicated that local cassava varieties can be improved for beta-carotene content without a decline in agronomic performance.

Key words:  Malnutrition, biofortification, phenotyping, Kenya.