Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 569

Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence and factors associated with healing outcomes of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers among patients with spinal cord injury

Ezema Charles Ikechukwu1, Idowu Opeyemi Ayodiipo2*, Anekwe David Emeka3, Adelugba Julius Kayode2, Nwoba Izuchukwu Michael2 and Ogunbameru Temitope Deborah2
1Department of Medical Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria. 2Department of Physiotherapy, Federal Medical Centre, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. 3School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Email: [email protected]

  •  Accepted: 11 January 2012
  •  Published: 28 February 2012

Abstract

Pressure ulcers remain a perennial challenge in the management of patients with spinal cord injury in developing countries due to lack of preventive facilities and trained personnel. This study assessed the prevalence and factors associated with healing outcomes of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers among patients with spinal cord injury in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. A retrospective case chart review of patients with spinal cord injury between January, 1997 and December, 2006 was carried out. Data were gleaned on gender, age, marital status, presence and number pressure ulcers per patient, worst hit body site by pressure ulcer, cause of spinal cord injury, spinal cord injury level, American spinal injury association impairment score (AIS), diabetes status, stage of worst hit body site and outcomes of healing. Data was analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics at α 0.05. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in the study was 51.58%. The sacrum and coccyx (56.20%) were the worst hit body sites by pressure ulcers. Gender (p = 0.00), aetiology of spinal cord injury (p = 0.01) and stage of worst hit body site by PU (p = 0.00) were associated with healing outcomes. The prevalence of pressure ulceration was high with a high majority of the ulcers not healing.

 

Key words: Pressure ulcers, retrospective, spinal cord injury.