Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 613

Full Length Research Paper

Traditional birth attendants and women’s health practices: A case study of Patani in Southern Nigeria

Oshonwoh Ferdinand E*
  • Oshonwoh Ferdinand E*
  • House of Renaissance for Health Initiative, Warri, Delta State, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Nwakwuo Geoffrey C
  • Nwakwuo Geoffrey C
  • Department of Public Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, P.M.B. 1526, Owerri, Imo State Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar
Ekiyor Christopher P
  • Ekiyor Christopher P
  • RAHI Medical Outreach, Choba Rd, Ozuoba, Port-Harcourt, River State, Nigeria
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 28 February 2014
  •  Accepted: 05 May 2014
  •  Published: 31 August 2014

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