Journal of
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health

  • Abbreviation: J. Vet. Med. Anim. Health
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2529
  • DOI: 10.5897/JVMAH
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 347

Full Length Research Paper

In vitro analysis of the dissolution rate of canine uroliths using Moringa oliefera root

Puran Bridgemohan*
  • Puran Bridgemohan*
  • Waterloo Research Campus, Centre, Biosciences, Agriculture, and Food Technology, The University of Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago.
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Aphzal Mohammed
  • Aphzal Mohammed
  • Georgia University and State College, Milledgeville, Georgia, USA.
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Ronell S. H. Bridgemohan
  • Ronell S. H. Bridgemohan
  • Monroe College, New Rochelle, NY, USA.
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Geeta Debysingh
  • Geeta Debysingh
  • Waterloo Research Campus, Centre, Biosciences, Agriculture, and Food Technology, The University of Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 15 December 2015
  •  Accepted: 15 September 2016
  •  Published: 31 October 2016

Abstract

Urolithiasis is a common disorder of humans and animals.  The surgical intervention to correct the condition is expensive and alternative cheaper botanical treatments should be explored. Various botanicals have been shown in vitro not only to dissolute, but also inhibit orolith accretions. In this study the in-vitro efficacy, anti-urolithiatic potential and dissolution rate of aqueous and ethanol, chloroform, and ether extracts of Moringa oliefera roots on canine uroliths was investigated without simulation of in vivo experimentation. In the aqueous extract an average dissolution of calcium oxalate (CaOx) was 77%. The rate of dissolution of the Calcium Oxalate (CaOx) increased linearly. However, ethanol and chloroform extracts increased both the rates of dissolution by weight and surface area linearly. The oral use aqueous extracts is considered a safe measure in treating various clinical conditions including urolithiais in humans and animals. The dissolution rates of ortholiths in organic solvents are probably associated with the presence of organic compounds unique to the Moringa family. The potential of using moringha extracts may prove to be an ethno-veterinary practice to address urolithiasis in animals.

Key words: Anti-urolithiatic, Moringa oliefera, dissolution rate, aqueous extract, magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP), calcium oxalate (CaOx)