Journal of
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health

  • Abbreviation: J. Vet. Med. Anim. Health
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2529
  • DOI: 10.5897/JVMAH
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 328

Full Length Research Paper

Status of mange infestation in indigenous sheep and goats and their control practices in Wag-Himra zone, Ethiopia

Adane Agegnehu
  • Adane Agegnehu
  • College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, P. O. Box 196 Ethiopia.
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Basaznew Bogale
  • Basaznew Bogale
  • College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, P. O. Box 196 Ethiopia.
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Shimelis Tesfaye
  • Shimelis Tesfaye
  • College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, P. O. Box 196 Ethiopia.
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Shimelis Dagnachew
  • Shimelis Dagnachew
  • College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, P. O. Box 196 Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 26 September 2017
  •  Accepted: 02 March 2018
  •  Published: 31 May 2018

Abstract

A cross sectional study was conducted from December 2016 to April 2017 to estimate the status of mange infestation in indigenous sheep and goats and identify the major species of mites and potential risk factors in selected districts with different agro-ecological zones of Wag-Himra zone. In addition, a questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the awareness and control practices of livestock owners on mange mite’s infestation. From a total of 384 small ruminants (120 sheep and 264 goats), 105 (27.33%) were positive for mange mites infestation on skin scraping examination. Sarcoptes scabiei was the only mange mites species identified with a prevalence of 33.3% (n=40) in sheep and 24.6% (n=65) in goats. Host factors such as species, sex, age and body condition were not found as a risk factor of S. scabiei infestation in the current study. However, there was a statistical significant (P<0.031) difference in prevalence of S. scabiei infestation in small ruminants between the three agro-ecological zones. The pathological lesions (crusts formation and loss of hair) caused by S. scabiei were observed on the face, head, ear and tail regions. The result of the questionnaire survey indicated that mange was considered as an important disease by small ruminant holders. From the interviewed livestock owners, 86.27% respondents explained that they use modern acaricides for the treatment of mange. The results of this study indicates that the agro-ecology had effect on the prevalence of S. scabiei in sheep and goats in the study area.

Key words: Cross sectional, ectoparasites infestation,   small ruminants.