Journal of
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health

  • Abbreviation: J. Vet. Med. Anim. Health
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2529
  • DOI: 10.5897/JVMAH
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 386

Full Length Research Paper

Study on prevalence of hydatidosis and cyst characterization in camels (Camelus dromedarius) slaughtered at Akaki abattoir, Ethiopia

Bulto Giro Boru
  • Bulto Giro Boru
  • Addis Ababa University, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Department of Pathology and Parasitology, P.O. Box 34, Bishoftu, Ethiopia.
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Yacob Hailu Tolossa
  • Yacob Hailu Tolossa
  • Addis Ababa University, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Department of Pathology and Parasitology, P.O. Box 34, Bishoftu, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Getachew Tilahun
  • Getachew Tilahun
  • Addis Ababa University, Aklilu Lema Institute of Pathobiology, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
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Hagos Ashenafi
  • Hagos Ashenafi
  • Addis Ababa University, College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Department of Pathology and Parasitology, P.O. Box 34, Bishoftu, Ethiopia.
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  •  Accepted: 19 September 2013
  •  Published: 30 November 2013

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2010 to August 2012 to determine the prevalence of camel hydatidosis and associated risk factors in camels slaughtered for human consumption at Akaki municipal abattoir. The results of this study revealed that out of 770 camels slaughtered, 474 (61.6 %) were harboring hydatid cysts with varying numbers and sizes in different organs (3850) in the following manner; liver (53.51%), lungs (40.39%), heart (0.13%), gastrointestinal track (GIT, 0.9%) and Kidneys (0.13%). The positive samples were put in plastic bags and taken to the laboratory for characterization of the cysts for fertility and viability. There was no significant variation between camels of different origins and the anatomo-morphological features of the cysts. The infection rates varied significantly among age groups (p<0.05), sex (p<0.005) and body condition score (p<0.05) of camels. The prevalence was found to be high (61.94%) in higher age group animals, that is, greater than 10 years as compared to 3 to 5 years (25%). The mean intensity of hydatid cyst among affected camels was found to be 3.1±5.8. Out of the examined cysts, 41.5% were found to be fertile and viable, while 18.3, 21.3 and 18.9% were non-viable, sterile and calcified cysts, respectively. The fertility of the cysts was  68.5 and 70.7% in liver and lungs, respectively.The high prevalence of camel hydatidosis affecting different organs indicates the seriousness of this disease particularly in the area of the origin of these animals that require an immediate control intervention.

 

Key words: Camelus dromedarius, cyst fertility, hydatid cyst, prevalence.