African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6578

Full Length Research Paper

Prevalence of equine lungworm and associated risk factors in Sudie district, Oromia region, south eastern Ethiopia

Kamil Abdulkadir
  • Kamil Abdulkadir
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, Jimma University, P.O. Box: 307, Jimma, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Nuraddis Ibrahim
  • Nuraddis Ibrahim
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, Jimma University, P.O. Box: 307, Jimma, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Yosef Deneke
  • Yosef Deneke
  • School of Veterinary Medicine, Jimma University, P.O. Box: 307, Jimma, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 09 February 2016
  •  Accepted: 02 June 2016
  •  Published: 04 May 2017

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2014 to March 2015 to determine the prevalence of Dictyocaulus arnfieldi and to identify associated risk factors in equines in Sudie district, south eastern Ethiopia. A total of 384 faecal samples were collected randomly from horses (n = 128), donkeys (n = 217) and mules (n = 39) for coprological examination. Isolation of D. arnfieldi was performed using a modified Baermann technique. The overall prevalence of D. arnfieldi was 164 (42.7%) with infection rates of 22.7, 57.6 and 22.7% in horses, donkeys and mules, respectively, with statistically significant (P<0.05) variation. High prevalence of lungworm infection was recorded in the age group of ≤4 years (50.9%) followed by the age group of 4-10 years (42.3%) and ≥10 years (40.46%), however, statistically non significant. Observed prevalence of lungworms in female equines was 37.1% and in males was 47.0% with no statistically significant difference (P>0.05). In this study, animals with poor body conditions were found to be highly infested (50.9%) compared to medium (41.6%) and good body conditions (21.3%) with statistically significant difference (P<0.05). The prevalence in non-dewormed equines was 53.2% and dewormed equines were 26.2% with significant difference (P<0.05). From this study, it can be concluded that body condition can be considered as one of the important factors which influence the occurrence of lung worm parasite in equines. It is recommended that owners should be trained to improve the management system, especially in terms of the level of nutrition so that the animal can have good body condition that confers some level of resistance against lung worm infection. In addition, strategic deworming should be implemented using broad spectrum anthelmintic drugs in the study area.

 

Key words: Equine, lung worm infection, prevalence, risk factors, Sudie.