African Journal of
Environmental Science and Technology

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Environ. Sci. Technol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0786
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJEST
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 945

Full Length Research Paper

Impacts of soil and water conservation practices on livelihood: The case of watershed in Gambela region, Ethiopia

Gatbel Chot
  • Gatbel Chot
  • Department of Natural Resources Management, College of Agricultural Sciences, Arba Minch University, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Awdenegest Moges
  • Awdenegest Moges
  • School of Biosystems and Environmental Engineering, Hawassa University, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Amanuel Shewa
  • Amanuel Shewa
  • Department of Rural Development and Agricultural Extension, College of Agricultural Sciences, Arba Minch University, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 22 December 2018
  •  Accepted: 18 January 2019
  •  Published: 30 June 2019

Abstract

In this study, multistage sampling technique was used. 132 households were selected out of 2,943 households in three sampled kebeles (the lowest administrative structure in Ethiopia) of Godere Woreda (Woreda is administrative structure above Kebele). Household-based interview, key informants interview (KII) and transect walk were used in order to collect data. Practiced households have harvested an average of 44.74 quintal of crop production per hectare per year while non-practiced households reaped a mean of 23.29 quintal of crop production per hectare per year with mean difference equivalent to 21.5 kg while practiced households earned an average of 3282.58 and non-practiced households earned a mean of 2661.97 Ethiopian birr per household per year with mean difference equivalent to 620.6. Practiced households demand an average of four persons while non-practiced households require an average of two persons per household. Practiced households use a mean of 30.89 kg of Di-amonnium phosphate (DAP) while non-practiced households use an average of 62.92 kg in their crop fields with mean difference equivalent to 32.03 kg. Practiced households use a mean of 22.27 kg of Urea fertilizer per household in their crop fields whereas non-practiced households use an average of 53.56 kg with mean difference equivalent to 31.28 kg of Urea fertilizer per household. With these findings, it is rationale to conclude that SWC measures have positive impact on crop production. It has slight contribution to household income. Labour demand (household and hired) increase, level of inorganic fertilizer use decrease but use of organic fertilizer increase. Thus, it is worth to recommend that non-practiced households need to be aware about the advantages of conservation measures but with due consideration to challenges hindering adoption. SWC measures need to be integrated with other income generating activities.

 

Key words: Impacts, Livelihood, practiced, non-practiced, household, adoption.