African Journal of
Food Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Food Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0794
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJFS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 899

Full Length Research Paper

Contribution of fish in improving micronutrients content in complementary foods for children aged 6 to 23 months in Lindi Rural District

Hope Masanja
  • Hope Masanja
  • Department of Food Technology, Nutrition and Consumer Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P. O. Box 3006, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Theresia Jumbe
  • Theresia Jumbe
  • Department of Food Technology, Nutrition and Consumer Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P. O. Box 3006, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar
Renatha Pacific
  • Renatha Pacific
  • Department of Food Technology, Nutrition and Consumer Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture, P. O. Box 3006, Morogoro, Tanzania.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 21 January 2021
  •  Accepted: 29 March 2021
  •  Published: 30 April 2021

Abstract

Lindi region has high stunting prevalence of about 35%, and one of the factors that cause stunting is inadequate intake of micronutrients for children under 2 years old. This study aimed at assessing contribution of fish in improving micronutrients, specifically vitamin A, zinc and iron contents in complementary foods for children aged 6 to 23 months old children in Lindi Rural District. A cross-sectional study was done; interviews were conducted on 212 caregivers with children aged 6 to 23 months at Mchinga Ward. Information collected includes demographic information and commonly consumed complementary foods for targeted children through the use of 24 h dietary recall. Also, laboratory analysis for zinc, iron, vitamin A contents and proximate composition were done for commonly consumed foods. About 89.2% of children were given fish-based complementary foods. On average, fish-based complementary foods had higher vitamin A concentrations (279 µg RE/100 g serving) compared to non-fish-based complementary foods (4 µg RE/100 g serving), but low in iron and zinc concentrations (0.66 and 0.067 mg/100 g serving, respectively) than non-fish-based complementary foods (0.74 and 0.074 mg/100 g serving respectively). Furthermore, fish-based complementary foods had higher proximate composition (except for % moisture content) compared to non-fish-based complementary foods.

 

Key words: Lindi, fish, complementary foods, children, micronutrients.