African Journal of
Microbiology Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Microbiol. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0808
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJMR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 5014

Full Length Research Paper

Antibacterial resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from clinical specimens at Uttara IbnSina Diagnostic Centre, Dhaka

Rashid Md Haroon
  • Rashid Md Haroon
  • Faculty of Preventive and Social Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Bangladesh.
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Md Motiur Rahman
  • Md Motiur Rahman
  • Faculty of Preventive and Social Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Bangladesh.
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Hafiza Sultana
  • Hafiza Sultana
  • Department of Health Education, National Institute of Preventive and Social Medicine (NIPSOM), Bangladesh.
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Md Khorshedul Islam
  • Md Khorshedul Islam
  • Faculty of Preventive and Social Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Bangladesh.
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M. M. Nahid Al Rakib
  • M. M. Nahid Al Rakib
  • Faculty of Preventive and Social Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Bangladesh.
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Muhammad Abul Kalam
  • Muhammad Abul Kalam
  • Faculty of Preventive and Social Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Bangladesh.
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Syeda Sumaiya Efa
  • Syeda Sumaiya Efa
  • Faculty of Preventive and Social Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Bangladesh.
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  •  Received: 18 March 2020
  •  Accepted: 16 April 2020
  •  Published: 31 May 2020

Abstract

Nowadays, antibiotic resistance is a global public health threat. Bangladesh is accelerated to this owing to its sub-standards healthcare along with the self-medication and overuse of antibiotics. The study aimed to assess patterns of antibacterial resistance in the clinical samples. The study was carried out at Ibn Sina Diagnostic and Consultation Center Uttara, Dhaka, from January to December 2019. All cultures and antimicrobial susceptibility test results of patients were extracted from laboratory records, using a semi-structured checklist. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS version 20.0. To ensure confidentiality coding was used instead of the patient’s identity. A total of 925 culture-positive results were analyzed, of which blood 620(65.0%) and urine 297(32.1%) samples were commonly diagnosed. The most frequently isolated bacterial were Salmonella spp. [601(65%)], Escherichia coli [244(26.4%)] and Klebsiella spp. [57(6.16%)]. The majority of the patients were females [540(58.4%)]. E. coli was found to be highly sensitive (>80%) to nitrofurantoin, meropenem, amikacin, amoxiclav, and imipenem; simultaneously, resistant (>45%) to cefixime, cephalexin, piperacillin, aztreonam, ampicillin, cefuroxime, and ciprofloxacin. S. typhi and S. paratyphi were sensitive (>80%) for cefepime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, tetracycline, cefixime, ceftazidime, cephalexin, cotrimoxazole, aztreonam, cefuroxime, and amoxiclav; concurrently, above 80% resistance for ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, gentamycin, and ampicillin. Overall, most of the isolates showed a significant rising rate of microbial resistance to ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, piperacillin, cephalexin, gentamycin, and ampicillin. The study findings revealed gradually rising rates of antibiotic resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The study suggested the prescribers should be avoided overuse and irrational use of drugs to reduce antimicrobial resistance. 

 

Key words: Bacteriology, antibiotic susceptibility, clinical samples, Dhaka.