African Journal of
Pharmacy and Pharmacology

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Pharm. Pharmacol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0816
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPP
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 2183

Full Length Research Paper

Prescribing errors among family and community medicine center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Norah Abanmy
  • Norah Abanmy
  • Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Fatimah Alrowibah
  • Fatimah Alrowibah
  • Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Family and Community Center, Wazarat Pharmacy, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Lobna Al Juffali
  • Lobna Al Juffali
  • Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Ebrahim Assiri
  • Ebrahim Assiri
  • Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Family and Community Center, Wazarat Pharmacy, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar
Mostafa Kofi
  • Mostafa Kofi
  • Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Family and Community Center, Wazarat Pharmacy, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 08 March 2020
  •  Accepted: 09 June 2020
  •  Published: 31 July 2020

Abstract

Prescribing errors are common. Available data on these errors, particularly in family community centers in Saudi Arabia, presents a problem that must be addressed. The aim of this study is to investigate the rate and types of prescribing errors at an ambulatory care setting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected to cover a 12-month period. A prospective review of hand-written prescriptions was made by a trained pharmacist to identify any potential errors therein. The main outcome measure was quantifiable rate and types of prescribing errors. A total of 177,406 prescriptions were scanned wherein 481 (0.27%) prescriptions consisted of at least one error for a total of 510 (0.09%) prescribing errors during the 12-month period of the study. The most common errors were: (1) inappropriate dosage and (2) inappropriate treatment. The uncommon errors consisted of: (1) incorrect drug, (2) incorrect strength, and (3) incorrect duration. All errors were corrected before the prescription reached the corresponding patient. Most errors were made during early morning hours. Lastly, the frequency of errors was highest with prescriptions relating to antidiabetics. Although the rate of prescribing errors in the subject family community center was not frequent, continuous education and monitoring is needed to limit such errors.

Key words: Prescribing error, rate, family community, primary care, Riyadh