African Journal of
Pharmacy and Pharmacology

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Pharm. Pharmacol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0816
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPP
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 2162

Full Length Research Paper

Teaching in pharmaceutical care: A systematic reviewTeaching in pharmaceutical care: A systematic review

Werlissandra Moreira de Souza
  • Werlissandra Moreira de Souza
  • College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil.
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Alessandra Rezende Mesquita
  • Alessandra Rezende Mesquita
  • College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil.
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Angelo Roberto Antoniolli
  • Angelo Roberto Antoniolli
  • College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil.
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Divaldo Pereira de Lyra Junior*
  • Divaldo Pereira de Lyra Junior*
  • College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil.
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Wellington Barros da Silva
  • Wellington Barros da Silva
  • College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 16 September 2014
  •  Accepted: 11 March 2015
  •  Published: 15 March 2015

Abstract

The aim of the work was to systematically review published studies about teaching methods in pharmaceutical care. Literature databases searched included LILACS, PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and ERIC. Studies published until January 2015 were searched for using the search terms “pharmaceutical services”, “pharmaceutical care”, “medication therapy management”, “learning”, “education” and “teaching” in different combinations. In the initial screening, the search identified 562 articles using the terms chosen; 21 articles met the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies (n = 15, 71.4%) were conducted in North America and only one study was conducted in Brazil. Regarding the teaching methods or learning strategies used in analyzing these studies, simulation was used in eight studies (30.0%), followed by the use of case study and problem-based learning in six articles each (28.5%). Different teaching methods were described; the most common was simulation, followed by clinical cases and problem-based learning. Most of these studies showed positive outcomes with the educational intervention.

Key words: Teaching, pharmaceutical care, active learning.