African Journal of
Plant Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Plant Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0824
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 683

Full Length Research Paper

Genetic analysis of groundnut rosette virus disease in groundnut (Archis hypogaea L.)

Usman, A.*
  • Usman, A.*
  • Department of Plant Science, Institute for Agricultural Research, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
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Ofori, K.
  • Ofori, K.
  • West Africa Center for Crop Improvement, School of Agriculture and consumer science, Department of crop Science, University of Ghana, Legon.
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Danquah, E. Y.
  • Danquah, E. Y.
  • West Africa Center for Crop Improvement, School of Agriculture and consumer science, Department of crop Science, University of Ghana, Legon.
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Offei, S. K
  • Offei, S. K
  • West Africa Center for Crop Improvement, School of Agriculture and consumer science, Department of crop Science, University of Ghana, Legon.
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Ado, S. G.
  • Ado, S. G.
  • Department of Plant Science, Institute for Agricultural Research, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 05 January 2015
  •  Accepted: 16 March 2015
  •  Published: 31 March 2015

Abstract

Groundnut chlorotic rosette disease (GCRD) transmitted by the aphid, Aphis craccivora, is an important virus disease of groundnut in Africa. Breeding for host resistance remains the best strategy to minimize losses due to this disease. Nine cultivated groundnut genotypes with differential reaction to GCRD were crossed in an incomplete diallel mating design to determine the combining ability of GCRD resistance. The parents and 36 F2 populations were inoculated with veruliferous A. craccivora at the seedling stage and evaluated for disease reaction at two locations in Nigeria in 2012. Disease incidence (based on visual symptoms) was recorded three times at fortnightly interval using area under disease progress curve. General combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) effects for GCRD resistance were highly significant (P < 0.01), indicating that both additive and non-additive gene effects governed the inheritance of GCRD resistance. The Baker ratio was low (0.3) for GCRD indicating that non-additive gene effects was more important than additive gene effects in controlling GCRD resistance in these crosses. As a result, progeny performance could not be adequately predicted from GCA effects alone. Therefore, effective selection of superior genotypes would be achieved at advanced generations when maximum homozygosity is attained.

 

Key words: Groundnut chlorotic rosette disease, area under disease progress curve, combining ability, additive and non-additive gene effects.