African Journal of
Political Science and International Relations

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Pol. Sci. Int. Relat.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0832
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPSIR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 390

Full Length Research Paper

Re-assessment of transition justice in Southern African States: Challenges and prospects

OBAH-AKPOWOGHAHA Nelson G.
  • OBAH-AKPOWOGHAHA Nelson G.
  • School of Arts and Science, Division of Humanities and Social, University of The Gambia, F86F+484, Serrekunda, Gambia.
  • Google Scholar
MARONG Madun N.
  • MARONG Madun N.
  • International Relations and Diplomacy, University of The Gambia, F86F+484, Serrekunda, Gambia.
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TARRO Momodou L.
  • TARRO Momodou L.
  • Department of Public Administration, School Business and Public Administration, University of The Gambia, F86F+484, Serrekunda, Gambia.
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  •  Received: 06 December 2021
  •  Accepted: 19 August 2022
  •  Published: 30 November 2022

Abstract

This paper outlines the origin, meaning and benefits of Transitional Justice (TJ). It looks at the various mechanisms or processes used to implement transitional justice. The paper also re-assessed transitional justice in Southern African states with focus on South Africa, Mozambique, and Angola. The historical background to transitional justice in these countries is given then their various TJ mechanisms examined. These portray the strengths and shortcomings of TJ in these Southern African states. The paper is based on a literature review and secondary sources on TJ in South Africa, Mozambique, and Angola. It shows written academic works of the transitional justice mechanisms in these Southern African states. Basically, the paper is descriptive in nature and historical method or Ex-post facto is employed. The paper shows that TJ processes do not necessarily have to be Western oriented or liberalist in approach. They can be locally driven or traditionally crafted depending on the context of the country. The article argues that in South Africa, Mozambique and Angola, different approaches were employed and all had some level of success. Therefore, Africa can always use African post-conflict mechanisms, not Western, to promote peace and reconciliation on the continent.

 

Key word: Transition justice, human rights, post-conflicts, Southern African States.