Journal of
Agricultural Extension and Rural Development

  • Abbreviation: J. Agric. Ext. Rural Dev
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2170
  • DOI: 10.5897/JAERD
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 384

Full Length Research Paper

Climate change, food insecurity and household adaptation mechanisms in Amaro Ward, Southern Region of Ethiopia

Baynachew B. Baya
  • Baynachew B. Baya
  • Department of Rural Development and Agricultural Extension, Mekelle University, Ethiopia.
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Thaddeus C. Nzeadibe
  • Thaddeus C. Nzeadibe
  • Department of Geography, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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Emmanuel O. Nwosu
  • Emmanuel O. Nwosu
  • Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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Ngozi L. Uzomah
  • Ngozi L. Uzomah
  • Department of Geography, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
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  •  Received: 26 February 2019
  •  Accepted: 18 April 2019
  •  Published: 31 May 2019

Abstract

Climate change poses an increasing risk to the agricultural sector and the dynamics that underpin food security. It is one of the main driving forces of the current food insecurity problem in Ethiopia and in Amaro ward in particular. The objectives of this study were to: Examine the current household food security situation in Amaro ward of Ethiopia; identify the adaptation mechanisms deployed by residents of the ward in response to the negative effects of climate change; and ascertain the coping strategies of the households in the study area with respect to food insecurity. A multistage sampling technique was used to select the study area and 100 sample respondents. Data was collected using structured interview and focus group discussions. Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) was used to examine the food security situation. Weighted Average Score (WAS) was used to analyze the adaptation mechanisms to climate change and the coping strategies to food insecurity. The results showed that majority (80%) of the households were food insecure. Majority (93%) of the respondents also utilized adaptation strategies contentedly. However, majority of households (71%) had great difficulty coping with food insecurity while 29% coped with relative ease. Hence, adaptation to climate change and coping with food insecurity are important factors that determine the welfare of households in Amaro ward. Therefore, common indigenous strategies adopted by farmers like replanting, annual crop rotation, regular weeding, change of meal preferences and reduction of the frequency of feeding in the area should be augmented with modern adaptation and coping practices to minimize food insecurity.

Key words:  Climate change, food insecurity, adaptation mechanisms, Amaro ward, Ethiopia.